Interior Header Image

Past Courses

This is an archive. Click here for upcoming courses.

Spring 2017 Courses

ENGL 211 - Editing and Publishing Practicum

Open to students from any major. Co-requisite: 200-level English course or permission of the instructor. 1 credit hour; may repeat this course up to 6 times.

  • Section 001: The Pen Practicum
    Malphrus—Tu 1:40–2:55; crn 51440
    The Pen, a publication of the Society of Creative Writers, features fiction, poetry, creative non-fiction, short plays, and (if the budget allows) artwork created by USCB students. In this one hour credit course, students will solicit calls for creative writing, evaluate submissions, compose style guides, design page and journal layouts, copyedit pieces accepted for publication, and organize strategies to publicize and promote the journal on campus and in the community. Beyond offering you firsthand experience for future internships and positions in editing and publishing, the culmination of the course each semester will be completion and publication of the journal itself. Open to students from any major.
  • Section 002: The May River Review: An Interdisciplinary Critical Journal
    Hoffer & Barnes—Th 1:40-2:55 crn 51441
    Are you interested in learning about editing and publishing? going to graduate school? finding an audience for the research that students do at this university? Yes?! Then English 211 is the perfect 1-credit-hour class for you. English 211 is designed to introduce students to important practices in interdisciplinary research through their work on the May River Review, USCB's interdisciplinary critical journal. Students will compose calls for essays, solicit and peer review submissions, update style guides, design page and journal layouts, copyedit articles accepted for publication, and organize strategies to publicize the journal in our community. Beyond offering firsthand experience for future internships and positions in editing and publishing, the ultimate goal of the course is the launch and promotion of the third issue and the production of the fourth. Don't miss the chance to be part of our staff and to put your signature on our journal! (no required course texts). Open to students from any major.

ENGL 222 - Creative Writing across the Curriculum

  • Malphrus—MW 12:30–1:45 crn 51443.
    Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective.

    "Curiosity about life in all of its aspects, I think, is still the secret of great creative people." 
    — Leo Burnett

    Got curiosity? Then this is the course for you. English 222 is a sophomore level creative writing workshop designed to give students of all majors the platform to experiment with their creativity and curiosity using words. We'll dabble with fiction, poetry, playwriting, and creative nonfiction (true stories told well) – and we'll read examples of each. Your critical thinking skills and expertise as writer, reader, analyzer, and articulator will be polished. Ours will be an intimate classroom setting where students and professor alike give and receive feedback on creative works in progress. All you need are English 101 and a desire to mess around with words.

ENGL 287 - American Literature

  • Barnes—TTH 4:30-5:45 crn 51444
    Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, and as a pre-requisite for the English major/minor.

    What does it mean to be an American? to represent life in the United States in 1776? 1850? 1929? 2017? In this survey, we'll develop an encompassing reading knowledge of U.S. Literature and complement that reading knowledge with an appreciation for literary historical periods and contexts. Our survey will cover the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, including the nationalist period; Romantic and Renaissance Americana; Civil-War fiction, nonfiction, and poetry; realism; naturalism; modernism, and post-modernism; among other intellectual movements. As we move from cultural epoch to cultural epoch, we'll see writers contend—often self-consciously—with Americanness in past, present, and future tenses. I'll emphasize watershed moments in American history/literary history in lectures and discussions, and you'll be held accountable for identifying authors and texts with their respective periods. We'll capitalize on our wide chronological scope and use it to study the ways American writers remember and revise one another. By stressing American writers' revisionist impulses, we'll also ensure that our understanding of U.S. letters is diverse. Our emphasis on memory will challenge us to think critically about representations of race, gender, and class, but also our ever-unfolding identities as local, national, and global citizens. Our course texts will include The Norton Anthology of American Literature (Shorter Edition Volumes 1 & 2; 978-0393930580) and digital archives/materials available on Blackboard. Open to students from any major.

ENGL 288 - English Literature I

  • Galloway—MW 10:30-11:20 crn 51449
    Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, and as a pre-requisite for the English major/minor.

    This course will cover over one thousand years of English literature, beginning with some of the oldest known documents written in the English language. Our literary journey will begin with warriors battling monsters in the pagan world of Beowulf, and end with the fall of man in John Milton's Paradise Lost. We will read texts by some of the biggest names in British literature to include Chaucer and Shakespeare, as well as a representative sample of lesser-known writers such as Marie de France, Edmund Spenser, and Christopher Marlowe. As we read, we will track the evolution of the English language from Old to Middle to Modern English. As we read, we will explore how literature functions as a vehicle to relate universal truths about the human experience, and we will examine how texts attempt to answer the question of "what does it mean to be human?" We will explore dichotomies in texts dealing with concepts such as fate and fortune, good and evil, and pride and humility. Heroes and villains will take the stage, as well as priests, prostitutes, and knights of King Arthur's court. The required text for this course will be the ninth edition of the three volume The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Volumes A, B, & C (ISBN 978-0-393-91300-2). Open to students from any major.

ENGL 289 - English Literature II: Pasts, Presents, Futures...

  • Hoffer—TTH 3:05-4:20; crn 51438 
    You don't need to take English Literature I before II. Pre-reqs: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, and as a pre-requisite for the English major/minor.

    ENGL 289 offers you a survey (broad overview) of major writers and works in the British literary tradition from the 18th to the 21st century. In spring 2017, our approach to this undertaking will be to examine, and to interrogate, some of the very principles that underpin the rationale for this type of course in English Studies. This means we will think critically about not only the literature we study but also about such terms as "literary history," "tradition," "convention," "canon," and "period." We will achieve this by focusing on the ways authors and texts engage with time, representing various perspectives on pasts, presents, and futures in their form and content. Along the way, we will study important disciplinary terminology and encounter major literary and cultural movements—Romantic, Victorian, Modern, and Postmodern—, exploring the contexts as well as the texts that have come to define them. Required texts are as follows: The Broadview Anthology of British Literature: Concise Volume B, 2nd edition (ISBN 9781554811335), H.G. Well's The Time Machine (ISBN 9780743487733), and Kazuo Ishiguro's Never Let Me Go (ISBN 9781400078776). Open to students from any major.

ENGL 301 / THEA 301 - Theater History I

  • Pate—MWF 11:30-12:20 crn 53929 
    Pre-reqs: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as a PRE-1800 course for the English major or minor, or for the Theater minor.

    Gods. Demons. Kings. The stages and pages of Western Theater History from the ancient Greeks to 1800 were filled with ritual and debate, religion and politics, economics and culture. In this course, we'll examine the development of theatrical texts and practices and their place in shaping social and aesthetic discourse. Part dramatic literature, part cultural history, this class digs deep into texts through close reading while also sending up a periscope to look around at all the other theatrical practices happening around the written word. We'll read about the impact of historical context on theater and about theater's impact on history. We'll read plays ranging from the Greek classics to medieval mystery plays to the Renaissance throughout Europe and through the Enlightenment. And, perhaps most importantly, we'll explore the theories of theater practitioners throughout history, in their own words, of how and why to create theater. Open to students from any major.

ENGL 411 - British Romantic Literature

  • "We see into the life of things": Green Romanticism
    Hoffer—TTH 12:15-1:30 crn 53931
     
    Pre-req: one 200-level lit course or instructor's consent. Counts as a POST-1800 course for the English major or minor.

    GREEN ROMANTICISM is an approach to the literature and culture of the Romantic era (circa 1770-1830) that investigates the nature of Romantic writers' engagement with nature and attempts to trace their impact on the ways we think about our environment today. "Green Romanticism" or "Romantic Ecology" takes as its starting point the Romantics' fascination with and connection to the natural world—their love of the land and its fruits, material and spiritual— and explores this investment in terms of the development not only of their aesthetic but of ecological, conservational, and environmental discourses from the late eighteenth-century to the present.

    In this course, our core objectives are two-fold. First, we will study Romantic poetry and prose through close, critical engagement with the period's major writers and texts as well as examine the cultural concerns that informed this literature. Second, we will discover the terminology and models of inquiry evoked by the literary theory known as ECOCRITICISM. This "study of the relationship between literature and the physical environment" encourages students to pose such questions as "How is the natural world, flora and fauna, represented in this poem? What role do landscapes—as literary "setting" but also in terms of the very concept of place—play in this novel? Are the values expressed in this text consistent with ecological wisdom? What interchange is possible between literary and environmental discourse? By studying canonical writers such as Blake, the Wordsworths, Coleridge, Byron, both the Shelleys, Keats, and Austen alongside less familiar poets such as Clare, Barbauld, Burns, and Smith through the critical lens of ecocriticism, we will find ourselves able to engage in new ways not only with the world as the Romantics knew it but with our own as well.

    Students in ENGL 411 will have the option to compose a traditional research paper OR to construct their own "Go Green" sustainability or environmental advocacy project for their final writing assignment. The books required for this course are: Mary Shelley's Frankenstein (978-0-393-92793-1), Jane Austen's Mansfield Park (978-0-393-96791-3), The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Volume D: The Romantic Period, 9th edition (ISBN 9780393912524), and Romanticism: A Very Short Introduction (ISBN 978-0199568918).

ENGL 421 - American Literature, 1830-1860

  • Barnes—MW 4:45–6:00 crn 53933
    Pre-req: one 200-level lit course or instructor's consent. Counts as a POST-1800 course for the English major or minor.

    The pages of Romantic and Renaissance Americana are populated with fascinating, sometimes even baffling, figures: a prophetic raven; a poetic selfie; a transparent eyeball; a resistant legal scribe; a barbaric yawper; a loquacious revolutionary; a self-isolated dissenter (who, frankly, often dined out in town); not two, but three autobiographical portraits by one inspiring man, a former slave; "the little woman who wrote the book that started this great war"; an elusive white whale. In this course, we'll study an extraordinarily prolific moment in American literary history—one that produced, in just a half-decade, many great American novels and poems: The Scarlet LetterUncle Tom's CabinMoby DickWalden, and Leaves of Grass are among the most famous. Indeed, these books' popularity, notoriety, and cultural afterlives are the reasons critics dubbed this period "The Renaissance." Though won't read all of these texts in full (of course! we'll spare your eyeballs!), we will read excerpts from several. We'll start, though, with an earlier moment, when the very idea of distinctively American writing—"Great" or otherwise—began to take hold in our cultural imaginations. Our project will be to trace what happens during this dynamic thirty-year period, which people have long read in terms of rising literary nationalism and individualism. While we'll trace those two important through-lines, we'll also push back against them by reading texts that challenge us to draw connections among diverse debates, problems, and representations of Americanness. Our course texts will likely include The Norton Anthology of American Literature (Volume B 1820–1865, edited by Nina Baym; 978-0393927405), The Bondwoman's Narrative (by Hannah Crafts and edited by Henry Louis Gates; 978-0446690294), and digital archives/materials available on Blackboard.

ENGL 426 - Contemporary American Literature

  • Rootedness & Restlessness
    Malphrus—TTH 10:50–12:05 crn 53928

    Pre-req: one 200-level lit course or instructor's consent. Counts as a POST-1800 course for the English major or minor.

    In this course we will engage in a number of full length and briefer texts as we consider an essential tension in American Letters—the impetus of the open road (or sea or sky or mind) and the desire to stay put. We'll hop in the car with Jack Kerouac for On the Road; get rooted in Newfoundland with Annie Proulx's Pulitzer Prize winning The Shipping News; pile in with William Least Heat-Moon for Blue Highways: A Journey into America; and come home with Wendell Berry's endearing Jaber Crow. Along the way we'll take side trips with The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, Travels with Charley, Slaughterhouse-Five, Suttree, Lolita, Go in Beauty, Lonesome Dove, The Powwow Highway, To the White Sea, The Lost Continent, and Going After Cacciato. We'll also tip our hats to a few great on and off road stories from bygone days—Gilgamesh, The Odyssey, The Canterbury Tales, Don Quixote, Gulliver's Travels, Candide, The Time Machine, Heart of Darkness, Tender is the Night, The Sun Also Rises, As I Lay Dying, The Grapes of Wrath, The Way West, and The Lord of the Rings. Oh yes, and poetry—plenty of poetry! The class will be conducted in seminar fashion, with emphasis given to intense classroom discussion.

ENGL 439 - Selected Topics

  • Stories of War
    McCoy—TH 6:00-9:00 Beaufort campus crn 53923
    Crosslisted with LBST 331: Topics in Cultural Historiography. As an ENGL class, pre-req: one 200-level lit course or instructor's consent. 439 is a Topics course and can be repeated for credit for different topics. Counts as a POST-1800 course for the the English major or minor.

    "It is better to live your own destiny imperfectly than to live an imitation of somebody else's life with perfection." — Bhagavad Gita 

    Who tells the stories of war, and what is the difference between story and history, fact and fiction, lived experience and memory? What do we learn from wars, and how do we reconcile the tragic inevitability of combat? What kind of stories do soldiers, journalists, and veterans tell of war? How do those stories reconcile with political and social history? And what can an ancient spiritual text, centered around war, tell us about US wars still being fought? The complicated, intricate, and multi-layered human act of war requires scholars to look at conflict from as many angles as possible. "Stories of War" aims to do just that, with our primary focus being on the human experience of war and the historical and social contexts of conflict. This course includes a focus on themes of war, such as the role of the soldier as the storyteller, and the importance of cultural contexts and how and when wars "begin." We will narrow some of our focus on the Vietnam War (literature and oral history), but we will also look at recent conflicts in the Middle East (via the work of Pulitzer-winning journalism), but all of our study will be framed around the ancient Hindu text the Bhagavad Gita, an ancient dialogue between a soldier and his horse as they face the complexities of war and life, birth and death, action and inaction. War may present us with similar stories, but each storyteller offers us a chance to see the individual experience of the awful beauty of war. Books for the course: Bhagavad Gita (Edition required: ISBN 1586380192) Forever War (Dexter Filkins) Bloods: An Oral History of the Vietnam War by Black Veterans (Wallace Terry), and The Sorrow of War (Bao Ninh). Open to students from any major.

ENGL 441 - History of Literary Theory and Criticism

  • Kilgore—MW 1:55–3:10 crn 53927
    Pre-req: one 200-level lit course or instructor's consent. Counts as a THEORY course for the ENGL major or as an ENGL elective. Students from any major with an interest in how societies talk about truth, fiction, rhetoric, and history are especially welcome.

    … there is no such thing as literature which is 'really' great, or 'really' anything, independently of the ways in which that writing is treated within specific forms of social and institutional life. — Terry Eagleton

    This course is an introduction to literary theory in the Western tradition from the Greeks onward. We will focus especially on the Greeks (Homer, Plato, Aristotle) became they frame the conversation to follow, and because these are "writers" that later writers—and students of them— will seek to disrupt. We will read writers—poets, philosophers, historiographers, rhetoricans, theologicans, novelists, (and even professors!) —who have sought to describe what literature is and how it functions in society. Their conclusions are not obvious (and are often not really conclusions, but disruptions) and curious minds will be necessary for this odyssey. 

    Our explorations will entertain many of the following questions: What is literature / fiction / myth / poetry? What is it good for? How is it dangerous? What is its relationship with truth? beauty? rhetoric? inspriation? craft? wisdom? power? the Other? justice? —especially justice. We'll read Homer's Odyssey, Plato's Republic, Sophocles' Oedipus Rex, Shakespeare's The Tempest, Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale or Hagseed, her revision of The Tempest if it's published in time— the following are not lengthy —Aristotle's Poetics, Longinus' On Great Writing, Philip Sidney's Defence of Poetry, Susan Glaspell's Trifles, and (through small chunks of text on Blackboard) possibly some Cicero, Horace, Augustine, Christine de Pizan, Shelley, Kant, Hegel, Marx, Emerson, Arnold, Derrida, Showalter, and Eagleton! Once the course is through, you'll have a good historical understanding of the debates and the means to enter into ongoing conversations about the roles of literatures in societies. 

    Required texts: Homer, The Odyssey (this translation is required: Robert Fagles, Penguin, ISBN 9780140268867); Plato, The Republic (this translation is required Desmond Lee, Penguin, 9780140455113); Aristotle's Poetics (trans. James Hutton, Norton, 9780393952162); Sophocles, Oedipus Rex (any edition, but Dover, 9780486268774 will be cheap); Longinus, On Great Writing (trans. G.M.A. Grube, Hackett, 9780872200807); William Shakespeare, The Tempest (any edition, but Penguin, 9780140714852 will be cheap); Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid's Tale (Knopf Doubleday, 9780385490818) but I'll alert you if we're doing Hagseed; John Caputo, Deconstruction in a Nutshell (Fordham, 9780823217557).

ENGL 462 - Technical Writing

  • Duffy—MWF 9:30-10:20 crn 51466 
    Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, or for the English minor and major and as a writing concentration course.

    Recent graduates find that communication in the workplace is often different than expectations would lead one to believe. The variety of methods, circumstances, and audiences dictate different needs for communication methodology. Technical Writing is more than writing about technology; it is writing technically to analyze, explain, and instruct audiences up and down the management chain internally, as well as externally. Projects in technical writing will practice both short- and long-term efforts, in both individual and group work settings. The text for the course will be the Handbook of Technical Writing by Gerald J. Alred. Open to students from any major.

ENGL 465 - Fiction Workshop

  • Malphrus—MW 3:20-4:35 crn 51481
    Pre-requisite: one 200-level literature course, or instructor's consent. Counts toward the major or minor and toward the Writing Concentration. With permission from the instructor, ENGL 465 (like ENGL 464) can be taken twice for credit.

    "The purpose of fiction is to help us answer the question we must constantly be asking ourselves: who do we think we are and what do we think we're doing?" -- Robert Stone

    If this two part question makes your fingers twitch, then pack up your pen and paper (muses too!) and join us for a writing workshop that is designed to expand a student's awareness of, appreciation for, and ability to create works of fiction. The class is writing intensive with the goal of improving all writing and critical thinking skills. In addition, this course offers global perspectives by focusing on writers from around the world. Students will receive feedback from both professor and peers as we establish a community of writers in an intimate classroom setting.

ENGL 466 - Writing Internship

  • Kilgore—TBA
    Pre-req: departmental permission.

    Internship in writing, editing, proofreading, and/or research with a community organization or publication, with training in writing effectively for diverse audiences in a workplace setting. If you are interested, please read this and contact Dr. Kilgore for more information.
  • Swofford—TTH 9:25-10:40 crn 57272
    Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as an English elective.

    What does "good" writing instruction look like? Can we really teach writing? In this class, we'll examine these questions, among others, as we examine the methods for teaching writing to students at a variety of levels. This course explores the theories and practices that inform writing instruction in K-12 classrooms, university classrooms, and writing centers. We are going to read about the "best practices" of teaching writing, watch experienced teachers guide student writers, and try out the things we've read and seen as we teach writing ourselves. In other words, the goal of this course is to provide students with both a strong theoretical foundation in writing pedagogy and the first-hand experience to put that theory into practice. Recommended for prospective K-12 and university writing teachers, writing center tutors, and English majors. Students who pass this course with a B or higher are eligible to apply to be paid tutors in the Writing Center.

ENGL 472 / THEA 472 - Cinema

  • McQuillen—M 6:15-9:15 crn 53925
    Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. As an ENGL course, counts as an English elective.

    Fire up the 70inch flat screen, crank up the surround sound, and turn the lights down…it's movie time! From Chief Brody declaring "We need a bigger boat" as he comes face to face with the giant shark in Jaws to Captain America's feelings of horror and sorrow at the realization that the Winter Soldier is his best friend, movies have a unique way to captivate and move so many of us. Yet, movies are both a shared and personal experience. Why do we like one film over another? Perhaps it's the witty dialogue, maybe it's the striking images in a scene, or maybe it's the emotional undertones of a great score. All of these reasons influence our decisions as to what makes for a good film, but there is much more at work in filmmaking. CINEMA 472 is an introduction to film class that will make use of engaging classroom discussions to find out what makes for an Oscar worthy film and what makes for a Razzie worthy film. We will do so by exploring the DNA of films to understand the importance of editing, lighting, camera angles, music, narrative structure, and other subconscious elements that help shape both our enjoyment and understanding of film.

Theater Courses

THEA 170 - Fundamentals of Acting

  • Pate — Section 001 — MWF 8:30-9:20 crn 51432
    Pate — Section 002 — MWF 10:30-11:20 crn 56020

    No Pre-reqs. Counts as humanities, fine arts, or liberal arts elective, and for the Theater minor.

    You don't have to want to be a great actor to benefit from an acting class. The skills and techniques we cover—everything from healthy vocal practices to script analysis and greater awareness of physicality and movement—apply to a wide array of disciplines, careers, and other opportunities. This class starts with the basics of Stanislavski-based acting methodology, the standard in American actor training for over a century. Our work builds toward a final project in which students perform for the class small group scenes from major plays. Students are also asked to write a final paper in which they discuss how the skills they learn in the acting classroom apply to their interests and aspirations outside of theater.

THEA 301 / ENGL 301 - Theater History I

  • Pate—MWF 11:30-12:20 crn 53930.
    Crosslisted with ENGL 301 above. Counts as humanities, fine arts, or liberal arts elective, and for the Theater minor.

    Gods. Demons. Kings. The stages and pages of Western Theater History from the ancient Greeks to 1800 were filled with ritual and debate, religion and politics, economics and culture. In this course, we'll examine the development of theatrical texts and practices and their place in shaping social and aesthetic discourse. Part dramatic literature, part cultural history, this class digs deep into texts through close reading while also sending up a periscope to look around at all the other theatrical practices happening around the written word. We'll read about the impact of historical context on theater and about theater's impact on history. We'll read plays ranging from the Greek classics to medieval mystery plays to the Renaissance throughout Europe and through the Enlightenment. And, perhaps most importantly, we'll explore the theories of theater practitioners throughout history, in their own words, of how and why to create theater. Open to students from any major.

THEA 333 - Directing

  • Ricardo—MW 9:30-10:20 crn 56143
    Pre-req: THEA 170. Counts as humanities, fine arts, or liberal arts elective, and for the Theater minor.

    What do directors do? They conceptualize productions. They communicate with actors, designers, producers, and audiences. They read and interpret scripts. They are managers and teachers and artists and custodians of texts and iconoclasts. This class will train you in the art of directing plays while also asking you to study that role, its history, its challenges, its opportunities, its implications for how and why we make theater. You will start with simple assignments such as arranging actors in space to create a stage picture and build toward the final project of directing an entire scene from a play. You will also write a report on a professional director that analyses her directing style and methods.

THEA 472 / ENGL 472 - Cinema

  • McQuillen—M 6:15-9:15 crn 53926
    Crosslisted with ENGL 472 above. Counts as humanities, fine arts, or liberal arts elective, and for the Theater minor.

    From Stanley Kubrick's time and evolutionary transcending scene of early man throwing a bone in the air in 2001: A Space Odyssey to Captain America's feelings of horror and sorrow at the realization that the Winter Soldier is his best friend , movies have a unique way to captivate and move so many of us. Yet, movies are both a shared and personal experience. Why do we like one film over another? Perhaps it's the witty dialogue, maybe it's a striking images in a scene, or maybe it's the emotional undertones of a great score. All of these reasons influence our decisions as to what makes for a good film, but there is much more at work in filmmaking. CINEMA 472 is an introduction to film class that will make use of engaging classroom discussions to find out what makes for an Oscar worthy film and what makes for a Razzie worthy film. We will do so by exploring the DNA of films to understand the importance of editing, lighting, camera angles, music, structure, and other subconscious elements that help shape both our enjoyment and understanding of film.

Liberal Studies Courses

LBST 250 - Liberal Studies Internship

  • McCoy— crn 
    Pre-req: Liberal Studies major or minor only, completion of LBST 297, consent of instructor.

    Provides students with the opportunity to apply interdisciplinary research skills across culturally diverse populations in a professional setting. Minimum requirement of 150 service hours.

LBST 297 - Interdisciplinary Research Methods

  • McCoy Online, consult with Professor. crn 53228
    Pre-req: 45 hours of General Studies and acceptance into the LBST program

    Introduction into individualized study including initial proposal development, review of courses and bibliography.

LBST 305 - Integrated Liberal Studies I

  • McCoy crn 
    One credit hour; can be repeated up to four credit hours. Prereqs: LBST 297; Permission of instructor.

    Students identify two courses in two different disciplines that have a correlative relationship beneficial to student's course of study. Student proposal of integrative study due pre-enrollment.

LBST 331 - Topics in Cultural Historiography

  • Stories of War
    McCoy—TH 6:00-9:00 Beaufort campus crn 52519.
     Crosslisted with ENGL 439. 

    Who tells the stories of war, and what is the difference between story and history, fact and fiction, lived experience and memory? What do we learn from wars, and how do we reconcile the tragic inevitability of combat? What kind of stories do soldiers, journalists, and veterans tell of war? How do those stories reconcile with political and social history? And what can an ancient spiritual text, centered around war, tell us about US wars still being fought? The complicated, intricate, and multi-layered human act of war requires scholars to look at conflict from as many angles as possible. "Stories of War" aims to do just that, with our primary focus being on the human experience of war and the historical and social contexts of conflict. This course includes a focus on themes of war, such as the role of the soldier as the storyteller, and the importance of cultural contexts and how and when wars "begin." We will narrow some of our focus on the Vietnam War (literature and oral history), but we will also look at recent conflicts in the Middle East (via the work of Pulitzer-winning journalism), but all of our study will be framed around the ancient Hindu text the Bhagavad Gita, an ancient dialogue between a soldier and his horse as they face the complexities of war and life, birth and death, action and inaction. War may present us with similar stories, but each storyteller offers us a chance to see the individual experience of the awful beauty of war. Books for the course: Bhagavad Gita (Edition required: ISBN 1586380192) Forever War (Dexter Filkins) Bloods: An Oral History of the Vietnam War by Black Veterans (Wallace Terry), and The Sorrow of War (Bao Ninh). Open to students from any major.

LBST 497 - Seminar in Liberal Studies among the Disciplines

  • McCoy— crn 50668
    Prereq: Senior standing in Liberal Studies or consent of the instructor.

Fall 2016

English Courses

At a Glance—
200-level Writing: 211 Editing and Publishing. 222 Creative Writing.
200-level Literature: 270 World (can substitute for 290). 289 English II.
Pre-1800: 419 Social Justice and Renaissance Lit
Post-1800: 302 Theater History II. 429 Way(s) West. 437 Women Writers. 439 Social Reform Transatlantic. 
Writing Minor/Concentration: 460 Advanced. 461 Health Professions. 464 Poetry. 

Great Gen Ed & Elective Courses requiring only 101 and 102, or equivalents, as pre-reqs: 211, 222, 200, 270, 289, 302, 460, and 461.

Scheduling Notes: 200 and 270 are only offered in Fall semesters. Theory courses are only offered in Spring semesters. 287 and 288 will be offered in Spring 2017.

For ENGL majors, the program requirement for a PHIL course can be met by LBST 397.

ENGL 200 - Introduction to English Studies

Barnes—TTh 12:15–1:30 crn 19809
Pre-reqs: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, and as a pre-requisite for the English major/minor.

ENGL 200 is designed as an overview of English Studies. This course is geared toward majors and minors as an introduction to the program, to those considering pursuing a degree in English, as well as to anyone interested in reading, writing, research, argumentation and education in the humanities. Together we will explore the history, present state of affairs, and potential futures of the discipline with an emphasis on the distinctive fields, practices, approaches, and terminology employed in the discipline. As we investigate Composition and Rhetoric, English Education, Literary Studies, Critical Theory, and Creative Writing, we will also hone your skills in the disciplinary fundamentals of critical thinking and reading, interpretation, research, and writing in various forms. Finally, we will discuss the diverse array of employment opportunities in the field. Texts to include: McComiskey, English Studies: An Introduction to the Discipline(s) (ISBN: 0814115446) and Pope’s Studying English Literature and Language (ISBN: 0415498767).

ENGL 211 - Editing and Publishing Practicum

Co-requisite: 200-level English course or permission of the instructor. 1 credit hour; may repeat this course up to 6 times.

Section 001: The May River Review: An Interdisciplinary Critical Journal
Hoffer & Barnes—Th 1:40-2:55   crn 19807
Are you interested in learning about editing and publishing? going to graduate school? finding an audience for the research that students do at this university? Yes?! Then English 211 is the perfect 1-credit-hour class for you. English 211 is designed to introduce students to important practices in interdisciplinary research through their work on the May River Review, USCB’s interdisciplinary critical journal. Students will compose calls for essays, solicit and peer review submissions, update style guides, design page and journal layouts, copyedit articles accepted for publication, and organize strategies to publicize the journal in our community. Beyond offering firsthand experience for future internships and positions in editing and publishing, the ultimate goal of the course is the launch and promotion of the third issue and the production of the fourth. Don’t miss the chance to be part of our staff and to put your signature on this now year-old tradition!

Section 002: The Pen Practicum
Malphrus—Tu 1:40–2:55; crn 19808
The Pen, a publication of the Society of Creative Writers, features fiction, poetry, creative non-fiction, short plays, and (if the budget allows) artwork created by USCB students. In this one hour credit course, students will solicit calls for creative writing, evaluate submissions, compose style guides, design page and journal layouts, copyedit pieces accepted for publication, and organize strategies to publicize and promote the journal on campus and in the community. Beyond offering you firsthand experience for future internships and positions in editing and publishing, the culmination of the course each semester will be completion and publication of the journal itself. 

ENGL 222 - Creative Writing across the Curriculum

Malphrus— MW 12:30–1:45 crn 19806.
Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective.

“Curiosity about life in all of its aspects, I think, is still the secret of great creative people.” — Leo Burnett

Got curiosity? Then this is the course for you. English 222 is a sophomore level creative writing workshop designed to give students of all majors the platform to experiment with their creativity and curiosity using words. We’ll dabble with fiction, poetry, playwriting, and creative nonfiction (true stories told well) – and we’ll read examples of each.  Your critical thinking skills and expertise as writer, reader, analyzer, and articulator will be polished.  Ours will be an intimate classroom setting where students and professor alike give and receive feedback on creative works in progress.  All you need are English 101 and 102 and a desire to mess around with words.

ENGL 270 - World Literature

McCoy—TTH 9:25-10:40 crn 25775
Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, and as a pre-requisite for the English major/minor. For ENGL majors, this course can substitute for ENGL 290.

I am not born for one corner, the whole world is my native land. — Seneca

Travel the world without leaving the comforts of USCB in World Literature this fall! Spanning nearly every corner of the globe, this course emphasizes the study of texts and critical thinking about world culture through selected readings in major literary forms since 1700. Globetrot your way through the Enlightenment, Realism, Modernism, and Post-War/Post-Colonial eras while thinking about different cultures and ways of approaching life through literature. Authors from France, Italy, Russia, Germany, Spain, Denmark, Norway, India, United States, England, China, Japan, Argentina, Senegal, Romania, and Iran encourage us to engage in our world through unfamiliar and exotic eyes. We will be considering a variety of literary forms: poetry, short stories, plays, novels, and graphic novels. We will focus on ideas of representation (character, setting, and historical context) as well as how to approach cultural difference. Open to all majors.

ENGL 289 - English Literature II: Pasts, Presents, Futures...

Hoffer—TTH 3:05-4:20; crn 24655 
You don't need to take English Literature I before II. Pre-reqs: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, and as a pre-requisite for the English major/minor.

ENGL 289 offers you a survey (broad overview) of major writers and works in the British literary tradition from the 18th to the 21st century. In fall 2016, our approach to this undertaking will be to examine, and to interrogate, some of the very principles that underpin the rationale for this type of survey course in English Studies. This means we will think critically about not only the literature we study but also about such terms as “literary history,” “tradition,” “convention,” “canon,” and “period.” We will achieve this by focusing on the ways authors and texts engage with time, representing various perspectives on pasts, presents, and futures in their form and content. Along the way, we will encounter major literary and cultural movements--Romantic, Victorian, Modern, and Postmodern—, exploring the contexts as well as the texts that have come to define them. 

ENGL 302 / THEA 302 - Theater History II:

Pate—MW 12:30-1:45 crn 24657 You don't need to take Theater History I before II. Counts as a POST-1800 course for the English major or minor or for the Theater minor. This course is cross-listed as ENGL and THEA. It doesn't matter which discipline you add to your schedule for USCB's purposes: the course will automatically count for either ENGL and THEA depending on your major or minor.

This course follows three major strains of influence in Western theater since 1800: the dramatic, the lyric, and the epic. We’ll see how realism transforms from radical and scandalous experiment to oppressive and banal norm. We’ll explore the various (and variously successful) attempts to translate artistic movements such as symbolism, expressionism, and surrealism onto the stage. We’ll discuss the political motives behind Epic Theater’s desire to continuously remind the audience of the fictive nature of theater instead of allowing them to be drawn into the performance. We’ll also explore how popular theater forms ranging from musical theater to melodrama respond to and help shape the more avant-garde theatrical movements. Reading assignments in this class often encourage students to use their textbooks and any other resources they can find to learn about a particular person or topic rather than provide a range of pages to read. The class culminates in a research paper in which students identify and engage with some ongoing discourse surrounding one of the topics or texts we cover. And don’t let the 2 fool you; there’s no need to take Theater History I before taking this class.

ENGL 419 - Social Justice and Renaissance Literature

Kilgore—MW 1:55–3:10 crn 24658 
Crosslisted with LBST 351: Beyond the Classroom I (crn 27172). As an ENGL course, Pre-req: one 200-level lit course or instructor’s consent. 419 is a Topics course and can be repeated for credit for different topics. Counts as a PRE-1800 course for the the English major or minor.

What is justice? Where is justice? How is justice?

The former king, old Lear, suddenly homeless, is outside in a horrible rainstorm and begins to understand something of social injustice:

Poor naked wretches, whereso'er you are,
That bide the pelting of this pitiless storm,
How shall your houseless heads and unfed sides,
Your looped and windowed raggedness, defend you
From seasons such as these? Oh, I have taken
Too little care of this! Take physic, pomp.
Expose thyself to feel what wretches feel,
That thou mayst shake the superflux to them
And show the heavens more just.

Lear wishes he had done more to help, and calls (too late to do any good) for a "more just" redistribution of the "superflux"--the wealth. In this course during this election season in the U.S., we will hear how unusual Shakespeare's words are in a king's mouth: we'll take a hard look at Renaissance social injustice in terms of economics, literacy, education, and differences of class, race, religion, ability, and gender -- reading accounts of the city of London, for example, learning about Queen Elizabeth's care for veterans of foreign wars, and seeking to better understand the status of immigrants and people of color in England. We'll think about how these Renaissance dynamics were played forward to shape the world upon our shores. We'll look for possible challenges to these dominant ideologies and brutal inactions --  paying attention to people who "did social justice" then and those who are "doing social justice" now, as we explore foundations of service learning and local organizations engaged in social justice work.

These cultural texts and theoretical texts will inform here-and-now community engagement, where we will go beyond the classroom and the campus. We will volunteer in our community (10 hours for the semester) and observe and participate in social justice work (we will find ways to make this work for everyone). This participation will be informed by the texts and theories we have studied, and the experience of community engagement will, in reciprocal fashion, help us better understand texts and theories.

Texts will include Thomas More's Utopia, Shakespeare's King Lear, and Claudia Rankine's Citizen (2014), as well as a variety of readings, viewings, and listenings that will be made available online. Folks taking the class under ENGL will do more literary type work than the LBST folks but will be pushed into interdisciplinary and community engagement directions: the final project will be a remediation of papers and assignments you've done in the class that have been re-intended for a local audience off campus -- perhaps a podcast, a video, or exhibit, but perhaps also a remediation that involves an enactment of social justice. LBST folks taking the class will engage their interdisciplinarity but also be pushed to think about words they read and write more carefully than is perhaps normal: the final project will be a researched proposal for a community project suitable for implementation in LBST 352.

ENGL 429 - The Way(s) West

Malphrus—TTH 12:15–1:30   crn 24659 
Pre-req: one 200-level lit course or instructor’s consent. 429 is a Topics course and can be repeated for credit for different topics. Counts as POST-1800 course for the the English major or minor.

West – the archetypal direction in American life and letters. Yet how do we define "Western Literature"? In this course, like Huck Finn, we will "light out for the Territory," perhaps hitching up where border fiction of the Old South leaves off, and make our way west, exploring literary depictions of people and places (and spirits and spaces) along the way.

As for writers, we will enjoy (summarily or in depth) many of the following: Willa Cather, Wallace Stegner, N. Scott Momaday, Terry Tempest Williams, A.B. Guthrie, Walter Van Tilburg Clark, Jack Schaefer, John Steinbeck, Louise Erdrich, Jack London, Ishmael Reed, Cormac McCarthy, Barbara Kingsolver, Nathaneal West, Thomas McGuane, Annie Proulx, Jim Harrison, William Eastlake, Mari Sandoz, Owen Wister, Thomas McGuane, Edward Abbey, Ivan Doig, and Amy Tan.

ENGL 437 - Women Writers

Hoffer—TTH 10:50-12:05   crn 24660 
Pre-req: one 200-level lit course or instructor’s consent. Counts as a POST-1800 course for the the English major or minor.

In this course, we will study the ways in which women writers from the 19th-21st centuries have imagined the future. Working across the utopian, dystopian and apocalyptic genres, women writers have cultivated their own tradition of speculative literature that is every bit as richly various and complex as similar but more well-known works by male authors. By pairing the fiction we read with excerpts from landmark arguments by prominent Feminist, Gender Studies, and Queer theorists, we will see how envisioning the fates of society, humanity, and our planet has afforded these writers the opportunity to explore alternative realities in which revisions to our understanding of gender and sexuality take center stage. Readings to be drawn from the work of Mary Shelley, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Ayn Rand, Diana Russ, Ursula LeGuin, Octavia Butler, Margaret Atwood, P.D. James, Suzanne Collins, and Veronica Roth.

ENGL 439 - Social Reform and Transatlanticism

Barnes—TTH 4:30–5:45 crn 24661 
Crosslisted with LBST 331: Topics in Cultural Historiography (crn xxxxx). As an ENGL class, pre-req: one 200-level lit course or instructor’s consent. 439 is a Topics course and can be repeated for credit for different topics. Counts as a POST-1800 course for the the English major or minor.

When you turn to the last two pages of Claudia Rankine’s Citizen (2014), you’ll see one of the most haunting, most perennially discussed canvases of the nineteenth century: J.M.W. Turner’s The Slave Ship (1840). (To study Rankine’s book, take “Social Justice and Renaissance Literature with Dr. Kilgore!) Turner’s painting, celebrated for its abolitionism even more perhaps than its proto-impressionism, was inspired by histories of the Zong, a slave ship “whose captain, in 1781, had thrown overboard sick and dying slaves so that he could collect insurance money available only for slaves ‘lost at sea’” (see more about the painting at the MFA’s digital galleries, which I’ve quoted above). To interpret Rankine’s interfacing pages, we might read Turner’s source texts; or the unfinished, unpublished lines he wrote three decades before painting the enormous 35¾ x 48¼ inch canvas; or John Ruskin’s reflections of it in his mid-century tome Modern Painters (1843); or Mark Twain’s un-tongue-in-cheek praise of Ruskin and Turner in A Tramp Abroad (1880). Our instincts would also remind us to read historical, art historical, and literary scholarship—to understand the Zong as one of too many tragedies over too many centuries of transatlantic slavery. We’d need to zoom in and out of ever-proliferating pages and screens. In fact, we’ll do all of this, and we’ll still be faced with a sense of bewilderment for a past we cannot fully fathom.

These are the kinds of circuitous, multi-layered, nested, encompassing reading practices that “Transatlanticism and Social Reform” will require us to do. Even the word transatlanticism urges us to check some of the most fundamental organizing principles in, for instance, surveys of British literature, or seminars in American literature, 1865–1914. A transatlanticist might wonder—who/what do we read when we emphasize national boundaries or periodize cultural moments and movements with wars? why do we read American literature and British literature, or Ruskin and Twain, in isolation from one another, or from the rest of the world? what happens to people whose citizenship proves to be much more difficult? how, then, do we remember the Zong or what revisionist criticism calls the Black Atlantic?

In this spirit, this course is cross-listed as a seminar in literature and in cultural historiography, since it introduces transatlanticism with a focus on social reform across the long nineteenth century. Our reading sequences will cover diverse authors, genres, and issues, but we’ll devote most of our semester to abolitionist movements. While our primary material will be literature, our studies will be necessarily interdisciplinary. We’ll read across oceans and intellectual fields, placing diaries, stories, rallying cries, poems, and travel narratives in conversation with drawings, paintings, and sculptures. I’ll situate discussions of course texts within historical and theoretical frameworks and we’ll read passages from critical articles/books. Our reading will challenge us to suss out not only what transatlanticism is, though, but also what it invites us to do. For me, this distinction is central to our course topic. We’ll work toward understanding transatlanticism at several registers: first, as an important turn in American Studies, Cultural Studies, Hemispheric Studies; second, apart from these capital-letter-type words, as reading practices that illuminate texts, contexts, and critical afterlives that might otherwise remain illegible in traditional courses or forms of scholarship.

Since this course isn’t about American writers becoming more American abroad, British writers becoming more British abroad, or concurrent swells in patriotic literatures, our reading sequences will be a little this-and-that; many resist “easy” national identities and aesthetic/generic categories. We’ll study works that are part fiction, part nonfiction, part guidebook, part polemic; poems inspired by other poems inspired by sculptures; and contemporary revisions of long-nineteenth-century “classics.” We’ll read letters Margaret Fuller published from Italy in the New-York Daily Tribune as a pioneering international correspondent. We’ll study Herman Melville’s Benito Cereno and Yusef Komunyakaa’s lyric reinterpretation of it; poems by Felicia Hemans and Lydia Huntley Sigourney, Elizabeth Barrett Browning and John Greenleaf Whittier; narratives by Olaudah Equiano and Mary Prince; travelogues by Harriet Martineau and Harriet Beecher Stowe, Mary Seacole and Mark Twain; and sections from two of Frederick Douglass’s three autobiographies.

While not a prerequisite, “Abolitionism in the Sea Islands” (Summer 2016; CRN 75266) will serve as a companion course to “Transatlanticism and Social Reform.” Both are interdisciplinary in spirit and in practice, designed for literature majors/minors and liberal studies folks.

ENGL 460 - Advanced Writing: Writing for Non-Profits

Swofford—MW 4:45-6:00 crn 24662
Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, or for the English minor and major and as a writing concentration course.

How can writing benefit the public good? In this section of English 460, Writing for Non-Profits, you will have the opportunity to benefit your community as we explore how not-for-profit organizations use writing to raise funds for the cause, change hearts and minds, and motivate participation from real-world audiences. As a class, we will create materials together for a local organization, and you will also produce texts for an organization of your choosing. We will first learn to examine the rhetorical situation of individual organizations in order to create a needs-based writing plan, then, depending on the organization, you may create rhetorically-savvy social media posts, blogs, grants, press releases, position papers, reports, policy briefs, or other public relations documents. We will learn to analyze genre and audience as a means of most effectively assisting non-profits in accomplishing their missions. Along the way, we will discover and develop strategies using new media rhetorics, project and client management, and professional communication skills. By the end of this course, you will be able to write effectively for non-profits as either professionals or volunteers.

ENGL 461 - Writing in Health Professions

Leaphart— Hybrid: W 3:20-4:35 and online crn 25464 
Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, or for the English minor and major and as a writing concentration course.

Preparation for and practice in types of writing important to those working within the health care and health promotion industry, from brief letters to formal articles and reports.

ENGL 464 - Poetry Workshop

Malphrus—MW 3:20-4:35 crn 19799
Pre-requisite: one 200-level literature course, or instructor’s consent. Counts toward the major or minor and toward the Writing Concentration. With permission from the instructor, ENGL 465 (like ENGL 464) can be taken twice for credit.

"A poet is someone for whom words have the maximum of significance," said James Dickey. If words do indeed matter to you in this way, then pack up your muses and join us for a semester of learning the art and craft of poetry writing. English 464 is a workshop formatted course designed to expand awareness of, appreciation for, and ability to create works of poetry.

The class is writing intensive with the goal of improving all writing and critical thinking skills. In addition, this course offers global perspectives of poetry by focusing on writers from around the world. Students will receive feedback from both professor and peers as we establish a community of writers in an intimate classroom setting. Further, each student will create a variety of original poetry, including the following forms: cinquain, couplet, quatrain, sonnet, villanelle, sestina, haiku, and blank verse.

ENGL 466 - Writing Internship

Kilgore—TBA
Pre-req: departmental permission.

Internship in writing, editing, proofreading, and/or research with a community organization or publication, with training in writing effectively for diverse audiences in a workplace setting. If you are interested, please read this and contact Dr. Kilgore for more information.

Theater Courses

THEA 170 - Fundamentals of Acting

Ricardo — Section 001 — MWF 8:30-9:20 crn 19810
Ricardo — Section 002 — MWF 10:30-11:20 crn 20871

No Pre-reqs. Counts as humanities, fine arts, or liberal arts elective, and for the Theater minor.

You don’t have to want to be a great actor to benefit from an acting class. The skills and techniques we cover—everything from healthy vocal practices to script analysis and greater awareness of physicality and movement—apply to a wide array of disciplines, careers, and other opportunities. This class starts with the basics of Stanislavski-based acting methodology, the standard in American actor training for over a century. Our work builds toward a final project in which students perform for the class small group scenes from major plays. Students are also asked to write a final paper in which they discuss how the skills they learn in the acting classroom apply to their interests and aspirations outside of theater.

THEA 200 - Understanding and Appreciation of Theater

Pate—TTH 8:00-9:15 crn 25566
No Pre-reqs. Counts as humanities, fine arts, or liberal arts elective.

In an increasingly digital and media-saturated world, does theater still matter? This course explores the history and practice of theater and its relationship to broader cultural and social issues to empower students to answer that question (and, of course, to better appreciate theater). We’ll look at Western theater’s roots as a practice of civic engagement, learn about how theater is made today and the various roles that contribute to its creation, and try to understand what theater’s place can be in broader discourse. In studying theater practices as varying as community theater, Broadway musicals, and Southeast Asian dance dramas, students will cultivate the tools needed to assess the role that theater plays in shaping not only our perception of the world but also the world itself.

THEA 201 - Introduction to Script Analysis

Ricardo—MWF 10:30-11:20 crn 20847
Pre-reqs: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities, fine arts, or liberal arts elective, and for the Theater minor.

Is it a literature class? Or is it a theater class? Yes! In this class, we’ll read several plays and discuss techniques for analyzing them to pull out such elements as tone, character, and theme, much as you would do for any close reading work in a literature class. However, our analysis will maintain a specialized focus on applications for performance. In other words, we’ll constantly ask how our close readings might be useful to an actor, a director, or a set or costume designer. We’ll also learn how to do historical and critical research to learn about a play’s production history and the discourse it has provoked. Our writing assignments will focus on how to communicate our analysis and research in the way that will be most accessible and useful to varying audiences including theater practitioners and theater patrons.

THEA 220 - Theater Laboratory

Pate—TBA crn 24663
1 credit course. Supervised participation in theatre production. No formal class meetings. May be repeated for up to 8 credits. Contact Dr. Pate - you must have his permission to register for the course.

THEA 302 / ENGL 302 - Theater History II:

Pate—MW 12:30-1:45 crn 24664.
You don't need to take Theater History I before II. Crosslisted with ENGL 302 above. Counts as humanities, fine arts, or liberal arts elective, and for the Theater minor.

This course follows three major strains of influence in Western theater since 1800: the dramatic, the lyric, and the epic. We’ll see how realism transforms from radical and scandalous experiment to oppressive and banal norm. We’ll explore the various (and variously successful) attempts to translate artistic movements such as symbolism, expressionism, and surrealism onto the stage. We’ll discuss the political motives behind Epic Theater’s desire to continuously remind the audience of the fictive nature of theater instead of allowing them to be drawn into the performance. We’ll also explore how popular theater forms ranging from musical theater to melodrama respond to and help shape the more avant-garde theatrical movements. Reading assignments in this class often encourage students to use their textbooks and any other resources they can find to learn about a particular person or topic rather than provide a range of pages to read. The class culminates in a research paper in which students identify and engage with some ongoing discourse surrounding one of the topics or texts we cover. And don’t let the 2 fool you; there’s no need to take Theater History I before taking this class.

THEA 370 - Intermediate Acting

Ricardo—MWF 9:30-10:20 crn 24665
Pre-req: THEA 170. Counts as humanities, fine arts, or liberal arts elective, and for the Theater minor.

Building on the basics established in Fundamentals, this class exposes students to other performance forms and training techniques. The class functions as an ensemble, with each student responsible to the group and vice versa. As an ensemble, we will create a devised theater piece before moving into monologue and scene work. Students are expected not only to take their own work seriously but also to provide thoughtful and constructive feedback on their peers’ work, which will also include several composition pieces in which students create small solo performances.

Liberal Studies Courses

LBST 305 - Integrated Liberal Studies I

McCoy crn 24063
One credit hour; can be repeated up to four credit hours. Prereqs: LBST 297; Permission of instructor.

Students identify two courses in two different disciplines that have a correlative relationship beneficial to student’s course of study. Student proposal of integrative study due pre-enrollment.

LBST 331 - Topics in Cultural Historiography

Social Reform and Transatlanticism
Barnes—TTH 12:15–1:30  crn 27173.
 Crosslisted with ENGL 439. See description above.

LBST 351 - Beyond the Classroom: Community Project I

Social Justice and Renaissance Literature
KilgoreMW 1:55–3:10   crn 27172.
 Crosslisted with ENGL 419. See description above.

LBST 352 - Beyond the Classroom: Community Project II

McCoy— crn 27602 
Pre-req: LBST 351

Each of us finds his unique vehicle for sharing with others his bit of wisdom. – Ram Dass

You’ve decided to make a difference in the world – and now is the time to implement it! Let’s see what happens when you put all those plans and proposals you created into action! Conducted as a small tutorial, this course allows students to explore and perform ideas for community change formulated in LBST B351.

LBST 397 - Readings in Philosophy: Virtue and Vice

McCoy—T 10:50-12:05 crn 25565
For ENGL majors, this course will satisfy the program requirement for a PHIL course.

It is the hour to be drunken! To escape being the martyred slaves of time, be ceaselessly drunk. On wine, on poetry, or on virtue, as you wish. – Baudelaire

Pride. Envy. Anger. Sloth. Gluttony. Greed. Lust.

Prudence. Fortitude. Temperance. Justice. Faith. Hope. Love.

Which virtues do you possess? Vices? How do these ethics apply for your plan to be a nurse, a writer, an entrepreneur, or a teacher? How might these beliefs influence you as a roommate, a student, a friend, a partner, or a parent? The seven virtues and seven vices of traditional Western thought represent more than just guideposts for living “a good life”; these 2,000 years-old tenets of human ethics continue to persist in contemporary works of art and literature – why? What is it about the human condition that historically insists we strive for goodness while avoiding bad behavior? And do we still value these beliefs? Use this interdisciplinary course to examine how cultural concepts of beliefs and principles influence you and your individual disciplinary practices. We will study excerpts from a variety of works, including Plato's Republic, the Bible, Dante's Purgatorio, and paintings by Giotto, Veronese, Cadmus and Brueghel. Open to all majors.

LBST 497 - Seminar in Liberal Studies among the Disciplines

McCoy— crn 20562
Prereq: Senior standing in Liberal Studies or consent of the instructor.

Summer 2016

ENGL 429 - Abolitionism in the Sea Islands

Barnes—Maymester M-F 11:00–1:45 crn 75266 
Pre-req: one 200-level lit course or instructor’s consent. 429 is a Topics course and can be repeated for credit for different topics. Counts as a post-1800 course for the the English major or minor.

What can a celebrated actress from London, a determined schoolteacher from Philadelphia, and a now-infamous fugitive slave couple from Macon teach us about Abolitionism in the Sea Islands? How did a woman free herself and her husband by passing and cross-dressing all the way from Middle Georgia to Savannah, Charleston, and Philadelphia? What did life hold for them in Boston and—after the Fugitive Slave Law passed in 1850—in Liverpool? Why did they return the lowcountry years later, hoping to build a farm and a school? How did England’s Shakespearean starlet—mid-century’s famed Juliet and Portia—become a different kind of transatlantic sensation? How did her divorce complicate/facilitate the publication of once-private journals: scathing critiques of plantation slavery? How did people fight for justice in the place we call home, just before and after emancipation?

Spend the first few weeks of summer learning about social reform networks in our own neck of the woods. We live in an extremely important place for nineteenth-century studies: a hotbed of secession and difficult reconstruction, yes, but also the sometime home to diverse abolitionist authors, educators, and activists. In this course, we’ll study a series of nineteenth-century texts with local composition, circulation, and reception histories. We’ll explore what people wrote about landmarks and watershed events that still punctuate our sense of place in Beaufort, Jasper, and Chatham Counties by reading powerful, painful, inspiring books. We’ll also take advantage of our compressed summer schedule to do some in situ reading and researching that will help us study mid-century St. Helena’s and St. Simon’s Islands, Mitchelville and Woodville, Charleston and Savannah, Butler Plantation and Seaside Plantation. In fact, part of our work will require off-the-page/on-the-road time: touring the Penn Center, visiting the Camp Saxton marker and the William and Ellen Craft medallion at SCAD (just installed in February 2016).

I’m organizing our three weeks around three texts: Running a Thousand Miles for Freedom by William and Ellen Craft (published 1860), Journal of a Residence on a Georgian Plantation by Fanny Kemble (written, 1838–1839; published 1863); and Charlotte Forten Grimké’s Journals and essays about the Port Royal Experiment and the Penn School (written, 1861–1864; published 1953). To contextualize this focused reading sequence, we’ll also study short passages by writers whose deep-rooted, sprawling abolitionist networks challenge us to engage seriously with current debates in American Studies about precarious historical and geopolitical boundaries. We’ll place our writers in serious conversation with Laura Towne, Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry David Thoreau, and Angelina and Sarah Grimké—and map important triangulations that link the lowcountry to Boston, Concord, and Philadelphia. By stressing the presence of the lowcountry in narratives by authors who emigrated or were displaced as fugitives, we’ll learn to read abolitionism regionally and nationally at the same time. As we’ll discover, our most local, coastal texts also require us to think transatlantically. In this spirit, our culminating writing project will link our university to our broader community. Students will create multimodal annotations / editions of excerpted passages as alternatives to traditional, researched close reading essays. Our goal is to make projects that enrich (maybe recast, maybe unnerve) people’s perspectives of our most immediate worlds.

ENGL 439 - Dystopia: Visions of the Future in Fiction & Film

Hoffer—Summer 10-Week T 1:00-3:30   crn 72962
Pre-req: one 200-level lit course or instructor’s consent. All students interested in dystopian, speculative- or science-fiction are welcome, regardless of major! 439 is a Topics course and can be repeated for credit for different topics. Counts as a post-1800 course for the the English major or minor.

dys·to·pi·a 
an imagined place or state in which everything is unpleasant or bad, typically a totalitarian or environmentally degraded one.

Meeting once a week, we will study dystopian fiction and film from the 20th-21st centuries in order to explore a broad range of conceptions and expectations regarding the nature and fate of humanity. Together, we will consider the state of affairs in our own day and age alongside such questions as: How have past generations of writers envisioned the future based on their own contemporary concerns? What common fears have dystopian texts forecast, and to what extent are those projections a reality or still a possibility today? What can this literary genre reveal about universal human qualities and anxieties? As inheritors of this legacy of dystopian fiction, how are our own imaginings for the future similar or different, and what insights can this offer us into our own present? Students will write two brief papers, take a final exam, and participate in a collaborative class project to compose and produce our own dystopian short film. Note: While NOT a pre-requisite, this course will provide a foundation for ENGL 437 Women Writers: [Re]Visions of the Future, offered this fall 2016. Interested students are encouraged, though not required, to enroll in both.

Texts and films likely to include: Zamyatin’s We (1921), Huxley’s Brave New World (1932), Orwell’s 1984 (1949), Moore’s V for Vendetta (1988), Anderson’s Feed (2002); A Clockwork OrangeMad MaxNever Let Me GoThe Matrix.

ENGL 462 - Technical Writing

Duffy—Summer 10-Week Online  crn 72957 
Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, or for the English minor and major and as a writing concentration course.

Recent graduates find that communication in the workplace is often different than expectations would lead one to believe. The variety of methods, circumstances, and audiences dictate different needs for communication methodology. Technical Writing is more than writing about technology; it is writing technically to analyze, explain, and instruct audiences up and down the management chain internally, as well as externally. Projects in technical writing will practice both short- and long-term efforts, in both individual and group work settings. The text for the course will be the Handbook of Technical Writing by Gerald J. Alred.

ENGL 466 - Writing Internship

Kilgore—TBA
Pre-req: departmental permission.

Internship in writing, editing, proofreading, and/or research with a community organization or publication, with training in writing effectively for diverse audiences in a workplace setting. If you are interested, please read this and contact Dr. Kilgore for more information.

THEA 340 - Oral Interpretation of Literature

Pate—Summer 1st Half M-TH 10:30-12:45 crn 75267
Counts as humanities, fine arts, or liberal arts elective, and for the Theater minor. Crosslisted in the Academic Bulletin with COMM 340.

When we think of literature, we think of the page. But all literature has its roots in the oral tradition; the earliest classics were spoken or sung and only written down much later. Let’s give the page a voice again. In this class, we’ll study healthy vocal practices and discuss how to apply our skills in literary analysis to the public performance of texts. We’ll also look for advice on delivery from classical rhetoric texts as well as more recent material. By practicing on delivering literary texts, you’ll gain skills that can apply to any public speaking situation. By the end of the semester, we will, as a class, devise a performance piece cobbled together from some of our favorite poems, short stories, and other works all related to a central theme we’ll decide on together.

LBST 250 - Liberal Studies Internship

McCoy— crn 75147
Pre-req: Liberal Studies major or minor only, completion of LBST 297, consent of instructor.

Provides students with the opportunity to apply interdisciplinary research skills across culturally diverse populations in a professional setting. Minimum requirement of 150 service hours.

LBST 297 - Interdisciplinary Research Methods

McCoy—online crn 75474
Pre-req: 45 hours of General Studies and acceptance into the LBST program

Introduction into individualized study including initial proposal development, review of courses and bibliography.

 

SPRING 2016 

English Courses

At a Glance 
200-level Writing: 211 Editing and Publishing. 222 Creative Writing.
200-level Literature: 287 American. 288 English I. 289 English II.
Pre-1800: 310 Shakespeare.
Post-1800: 302 Theater History II. 422 American 1860-1910.  427 Southern. 429 Vietnam War.  
Theory: 442 Modern Theory.
Writing Minor/Concentration: 461 Health Professions. 462 Technical. 465 Fiction.

Great Gen Ed & Elective Courses requiring only 101 and 102, or equivalents, as pre-reqs: 211, 222, 287, 288, 289, 302, 461, and 462.

Scheduling Notes: 200 and 290 are only offered in Fall semesters. 289 and Theory courses are only offered in Spring semesters.

ENGL 211 - Editing and Publishing Practicum

Co-requisite: 200-level English course or permission of the instructor. 1 credit hour; may repeat this course up to 6 times.

Section 001: The May River Review: An Interdisciplinary Critical Journal
Hoffer & Barnes—Th 1:40–2:55   crn 53578
Are you interested in learning about editing and publishing? going to graduate school? finding an audience for the research that students do at this university? Yes?! Then English 211 is the perfect 1-credit-hour class for you. English 211 is designed to introduce students to important practices in interdisciplinary research through their work on the May River Review, USCB’s interdisciplinary critical journal. Students will compose calls for essays, solicit and peer review submissions, update style guides, design page and journal layouts, copyedit articles accepted for publication, and organize strategies to publicize the journal in our community. Beyond offering firsthand experience for future internships and positions in editing and publishing, the ultimate goal of the course is the launch and promotion of the second issue and the production of the third. Don’t miss the chance to be part of our staff and to put your signature on this now year-old tradition!

Section 002: The Pen Practicum
Malphrus—T 1:40–2:55   crn 53579
The Pen, a publication of the Society of Creative Writers, features fiction, poetry, creative non-fiction, short plays, and (if the budget allows) artwork created by USCB students. In this one hour credit course, students will solicit calls for creative writing, evaluate submissions, compose style guides, design page and journal layouts, copyedit pieces accepted for publication, and organize strategies to publicize and promote the journal on campus and in the community. Beyond offering you firsthand experience for future internships and positions in editing and publishing, the culmination of the course each semester will be completion and publication of the journal itself. 

ENGL 222 - Creative Writing across the Curriculum

Malphrus— MW 12:30– 1:40  crn 53581.
Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective.

“Curiosity about life in all of its aspects, I think, is still the secret of great creative people.” — Leo Burnett

Got curiosity? Then this is the course for you. English 222 is a sophomore level creative writing workshop designed to give students of all majors the platform to experiment with their creativity and curiosity using words. We’ll dabble with fiction, poetry, playwriting, and creative nonfiction (true stories told well) – and we’ll read examples of each.  Your critical thinking skills and expertise as writer, reader, analyzer, and articulator will be polished.  Ours will be an intimate classroom setting where students and professor alike give and receive feedback on creative works in progress.  All you need are English 101 and 102 and a desire to mess around with words.

ENGL 287 - American Literature 

Barnes—TTH  4:30–5:45   crn 53582
Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, and as a pre-requisite for the English major/minor.

What does it mean to be an American? to represent life in the United States in 1776? 1850? 1929? 2015? In this survey, we’ll develop an encompassing reading knowledge of U.S. Literature and complement that reading knowledge with an appreciation for literary historical periods and contexts. Our survey will cover the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, including the nationalist period; Romantic and Renaissance Americana; Civil-War fiction, nonfiction, and poetry; realism; naturalism; modernism, and post-modernism; among other intellectual movements. As we move from cultural epoch to cultural epoch, we’ll see writers contend—often self-consciously—with Americanness in past, present, and future tenses. I’ll emphasize watershed moments in American history/literary history in lectures and discussions, and you’ll be held accountable for identifying authors and texts with their respective periods. We’ll capitalize on our wide chronological scope and use it to study the ways American writers remember and revise one another. By stressing American writers’ revisionist impulses, we’ll also ensure that our understanding of U.S. letters is diverse. Our emphasis on memory will challenge us to think critically about representations of race, gender, and class, but also our ever-unfolding identities as local, national, and global citizens. Our course texts will include The Norton Anthology of American Literature (Shorter Edition Volumes 1 & 2; 978-0393930580) and digital archives/materials available on Blackboard.

ENGL 288 - English Literature I

Galloway HolmesMW 11:30 - 12:20  crn 53538
Course offered in hybrid format (in person and online). Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, and as a pre-requisite for the English major/minor.

This course will cover over one thousand years of English literature, beginning with some of the oldest known documents written in the English language.  Our literary journey will begin with warriors battling monsters in the pagan world of Beowulf, and end with the fall of man in John Milton’s Paradise Lost.   We will read texts by some of the biggest names in British literature to include Chaucer and Shakespeare, as well as a representative sample of lesser-known writers such as Marie de France, Edmund Spenser, and Christopher Marlowe.  As we read, we will track the evolution of the English language from Old to Middle to Modern English.   As we read, we will explore how literature functions as a vehicle to relate universal truths about the human experience, and we will examine how texts attempt to answer the question of “what does it mean to be human?”  We will explore dichotomies in texts dealing with concepts such as fate and fortune, good and evil, and pride and humility.  Heroes and villains will take the stage, as well as priests, prostitutes, and knights of King Arthur’s court.  The required text for this course will be the ninth edition of the three volume The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Volumes A, B, & C (ISBN 978-0-393-91300-2).

ENGL 289 - English Literature II: Pasts, Presents, Futures...

HofferTTH 3:05 - 4:20  crn 53576 
Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, and as a pre-requisite for the English major/minor.

ENGL 289 is intended to offer you a survey (a broad overview) of major writers and works in the British literary tradition from the 18th to the 21st century. In Spring 2016, our approach to this mammoth undertaking will be to examine, and to interrogate, some of the very principles that underpin the rationale for this type of survey course in English Studies curriculum. This means we will think critically about not only the literature we study but also about such terms as “literary history,” “tradition,” “convention,”  “canon,” “period,” “adaptation,” “revision,” “innovation,” “original,” “classic,” “modern,” and “postmodern.” We will achieve this by focusing on the ways authors and texts engage with time, representing various perspectives on pasts, presents, and futures in their form and content. Along the way, we will encounter major literary and cultural movements--Romantic, Victorian, Modern, and Postmodern—, exploring the contexts as well as the texts that have come to define them. Required reading likely to include: The Broadview Anthology of British Literature, Vol. B 2nd edition (ISBN 9781554811335) as well as Jane Austen’s Persuasion, Charles Dickens’s Hard Times, Virginia Woolf’s Between the Acts, and Ishiguro’s Never Let Me Go.

ENGL 302/ THEA 302 -  Theater History II:

PateMWF 10:30 - 11:20 crn 53596 Counts as a post-1800 course for the English major or minor or for the Theater minor. This course is cross-listed as ENGL and THEA. It doesn't matter which discipline you add to your schedule for USCB's purposes: the course will automatically count for either ENGL and THEA depending on your major or minor.

Theatrical Modernisms: The 19th century Melodrama, the theatrical realization of Romanticism, sparked an obsession with the modern among theater-makers that persists to this day. Theater becomes obsessed with breaking from its own past even as it continuously recreates it.  Realism rejects melodrama, expressionism rejects realism, absurdism rejects itself, and the postdramatic rejects drama in favor of pure theatricality. Through each of these moments, we’ll read not only plays but also essays on acting, directing, scene design, and other theatrical disciplines by the very artists who defined the development of Western theater. Rather than construct a linear narrative, we’ll try to navigate the complex network of influences and reactions that constitute theater for the last two hundred years. We’ll watch recorded performances of everything from Peter Brook’s hugely influential Marat/ Sade to the Open Theater’s street performances such as Paradise Now. The time we cover includes theater riots and riots as theater. It’s raucous, messy, and performative. Come join in the fun.

ENGL 310/ THEA 310 -  Reading and Performing Shakespeare 

Kilgore & PateMW 1:55 - 3:10   ENGL crn 56331 THEA crn 56332 
Counts as a pre-1800 course for the English major or minor or for the Theater minor. This course is cross-listed as ENGL and THEA. It doesn't matter which discipline you add to your schedule for USCB's purposes: the course will automatically count for either ENGL and THEA depending on your major or minor.

Be not afeard; the isle is full of noises,
Sounds and sweet airs, that give delight and hurt not.
Caliban, The Tempest 3.2

"Shakespeare" is both a fixed text and something that is in motion. The goal of this course (taught jointly by Dr. Pate and Dr. Kilgore) is to study performance history and critical history while performing and doing criticism—to encourage you to think and read and experience and perform “Shakespeare” —beyond yet through the text.  As a joint Theater and English course, we intend to flex your understandings of and inspire your imaginations about words we use casually like “text,” “interpretation,” performance.” You will be asked to understand a variety of plays as literary texts, sure, but also as living performances—both in the here and now and historically. And you will be asked (and you’ll get help doing this) to perform some yourself, to breathe in and out real air while you “play” “Shakespeare” in front of real and imagined audiences. Texts: Folger Library Editions (Simon and Schuster) of Twelfth Night (9780743484961), Henry V (780743484879), The Tempest (9780743482837), and Romeo and Juliet (9780743477116), as well as Russ McDonald, The Bedford Companion to Shakespeare: An Introduction with Documents, 2nd ed. (978-0312248802)

ENGL 422 - American Literature, 1860-1910

Barnes—MW 4:45–6:00   crn 53606 
Pre-req: one 200-level lit course or instructor’s consent. Counts as a post-1800 course for the the English major or minor. 

Picture the Upper Bay, the harbor between the Atlantic Ocean and the Hudson River, the port of New York and New Jersey, our Eastern Seaboard starting point for mapping the field of U.S. Literature, 1860–1910. Imagine this storied spot in 1855 and in 1904, two distinct cultural moments, overlapping one another in your mind, if only for a minute. In 1855, Walt Whitman (world-renowned Brooklyn Bard, self-proclaimed “Son of Manhattan Island”) published the first edition of the poem that would become Song of Myself. Whitman, addressing us and turning west, wonders: “Have you reckoned a thousand acres much? Have you reckoned the earth much? / Have you practised so long to learn to read? / Have you felt so proud to get at the meaning of poems?” As he draws us into this expansive lyric, he urges us to question how we read, how we know what we know, how we survey our place on this globe, and—implicitly and importantly—how we connect such seemingly sundry invocations. In fact, Whitman himself avows elsewhere that “the United States themselves are essentially the greatest poem.” Henry James writes along similar lines fifty years later, when his steamship lands just across the harbor. After living and writing abroad for over two decades (without having returned once), he arrived in Hoboken, overwhelmed by how much had changed in his country and in his mind. “My visit to America had been the first possible to me for nearly a quarter of a century,” James writes, “and I had before my last previous one, brief and distant to memory, spent other years in continuous absence; so that I was to return with much of the freshness of eye, outward and inward, which, with the further contribution of a state of desire, is commonly held a precious agent of perception.” The American Scene, published in 1904–1905, opens by looking “outward and inward,” inland and out-to-sea/over-the-pond all at once—and by connecting expatriation, even estrangement, to his refreshed sense of narrative perspective. 

English 422 covers this fascinating period in U.S. literary history: from Walt Whitman to Henry James, from the years just before the Civil War to the years just before the First World War. We’ll begin our course by studying Henry David Thoreau’s “A Plea for Captain John Brown,” written about a moment that divided the nation and precipitated the Civil War: Harpers Ferry and its aftermath in the fall of 1859. In 1910, our stop-point, Wilbur and Orville Wright piloted their only flight together in Ohio and Glacier National Park was established in Montana. Between 1910 and 1911, our cultural gaze telescopes from the cosmic to the subatomic, from Halley’s comet to Ernest Rutherford’s gold foil experiment. Such watersheds remind us that this half-century is bookended by incredible innovations, but also by national and global fractures; at the same time, it’s known now for the rise of American Regionalism. We’ll study these capital-letter eras and terms: the Civil War, Reconstruction, the Gilded Age, the Jim Crow Era, the Great American Poet, the International Novel, Regionalism, Realism, Naturalism, fin-de-siècle Aestheticism, and some Modernist inklings. 

One way to approach this period has been to read the canon geopolitically, from North and South to World Power. Another has been to trace U.S. letters through cosmopolitanism or internationalism. We’ll think about the ways these texts invite us to hone reading practices that re-draw literary borderlines and literary margins. We’ll focus on representations of American lives that require us to think locally and globally at the same time. Interestingly, many of the most famous texts from this period have complex revision, publication, circulation, reception, and censorship histories that span several decades. In addition to focusing on the significance of place, then, we’ll also study what happens to literature itself during this tumultuous period—especially since such changes are bound to critical calls for reading regionally and transatlantically. Our course texts include Emily Dickinson ArchiveWalt Whitman ArchiveThe Rise of Silas Lapham by William Dean Howells; (ISBN: 9781593082871); The Portrait of a Lady by Henry James (ISBN: 9780141439631); Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman (ISBN: 9780393974966); American Women Regionalists edited by Judith Fetterley and Marjorie Pryse (ISBN: 9780393313635);one novel by Mark Twain (tbd) and excerpts from The Innocents Abroad and Life on the Mississippi.

ENGL 427 - Southern Literature

Malphrus—TTH 10:50–12:05   crn 53601 
Pre-req: one 200-level lit course or instructor’s consent. Counts as a post-1800 course for the the English major or minor.  

“You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view--until you climb inside of his skin and walk around in it.”                                                                                        -- Harper Lee

Let’s do it! Let’s climb inside some skin and see what we can make of Southern Literature – starting with the hot-off-the-press “sequel” to To Kill a Mockingbird.  And since USCB hosted “Conroy at 70: A Celebration of South Carolina’s Prince of Titles” last semester, we’ll read The Prince of Tides. Then we’ll continue our focus on Carolina with James Dickey’s Deliverance, Ron Rash’s One Foot in Edenand Gloria Naylor’s Mama Day. Of course there will be Faulkner as well (Go Down, Moses)We’ll also tip our hats to top guns such as Mark Twain, Eudora Welty, Richard Wright, Robert Penn Warren, Flannery O’Connor, Tennessee Williams, and we’ll focus our attention specifically on South Carolina writers – from William Gilmore Simms to Henry Timrod to Mary Boykin Chesnut to Julia Peterkin to DuBose Heyward to Percival Everett to Josephine Humphreys to Dorothy Allison to Nikky Finney. 

ENGL 429 - Topics in American Lit: The Vietnam War

McCoy—TTH 9:25-10:40   crn 54309 
Crosslisted with LBST 331: Topics in Cultural Historiography (crn 56327). As an ENGL class, pre-req: one 200-level lit course or instructor’s consent. Counts as a post-1800 course for the the English major or minor.  

This course uses film, autobiographies, oral histories, literature, and historical texts to examine the Vietnam War (1955-1975). We will look at everything from how the war began to who its major players were, with the aim of gaining an interdisciplinary understanding of American cultural history. Open to all majors.

ENGL 442 - Principles of Modern Literary Theory - Once Upon a Theory

HofferTTH 12:15 – 1:30  crn 53604 
Pre-req: one 200-level lit course or instructor’s consent. Counts towards the major or minor. Meets the major literary theory requirement. 

Theory is often described as a lens:  a distinct set of terms and ideas that, when “put on” like a pair of glasses, enables a different way of seeing and understanding the world—or, when it comes to literary theory, a different way of seeing and understanding texts.  Theory has a long history reaching all the way back to antiquity, but the 20th century was what many consider the heyday of literary theory as one after another “school” emerged and transformed the way scholars think about literature and culture. In this course, we will try on many different lenses as we study the development and nature of several major modern theories.  The course has two principal goals:  1.) to expose you to a number of critical theories through a study of the terminology, concepts, and primary texts by the theorists who helped to define those perspectives, and 2.) to enable you to use these theories in order to formulate your own interpretive arguments about texts. The focus of our theoretical applications for in-class discussion and writing assignments —the playground upon which we will enact these theoretical principles—will be the fairy tale tradition. Through our examination of classic fairy tales and their contemporary adaptations (many of these revisions shaped by the very theories we will encounter), we will practice using theory to create literary criticism.  We will investigate the types of readings available through each theoretical perspective; explore how different theories can be applied to a single text to allow for a rich diversity of meaning; and discover the ways that theories can be blended together to form still further innovations in interpretation.  Required texts: Critical Theory Today, 3rd ed.(ISBN 9780415506755), Critical Theory: A Reader for Literary and Cultural Studies (ISBN 9780199797776 ) and The Classic Fairy Tales (ISBN 9780393972771).

ENGL 461 - Writing in Health Professions

Leaphart— Hybrid: T 3:05 - 4:20 and online    crn 56329 
Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, or for the English minor and major and as a writing concentration course.

Preparation for and practice in types of writing important to those working within the health care and health promotion industry, from brief letters to formal articles and reports. 

ENGL 462 - Technical Writing 

Duffy—MWF 9:30 - 10:20  crn 53608
Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, or for the English minor and major and as a writing concentration course.

In this course, students will balance practice and theory to lay the foundation for a career as a technical writer. Technical writing is not so much in the writing about technology, but in explaining things technically to audiences which may be unfamiliar with a certain subject matter. Students complete writing projects that develop the practical skills that professional writers use on the job. Activities will include conducting research for audience analysis; techniques of document design; fundamentals of the visual display of data; and team project work that will require use of in-person and online communication tools. Assignments for the course will range in size and scope, individual and group formats, in order to best realize the various rhetorical situations students may expect to experience in professional fields. Text: Alred, Gerald, et al. Handbook of Technical Writing, 10th ed. ISBN 13: 978-1250004413.

ENGL 465 - Fiction Workshop 

Malphrus—MW 3:20 - 4:35  crn 53628
Pre-requisite: one 200-level literature course, or instructor’s consent. Counts toward the major or minor and toward the Writing Concentration. With permission from the instructor, ENGL 465 (like ENGL 464) can be taken twice for credit.

“Get it down.  Take chances. It may be bad, but it’s the only way you can do anything really good.”— William Faulkner

If this quotation resonates, then pack up your pen and paper (muses too!) and join us for a writing workshop that is designed to expand your awareness of, appreciation for, and ability to create works of fiction. The class is writing intensive with the goal of improving all writing and critical thinking skills. In addition, this course offers global perspectives by focusing on writers from around the world. Students will receive feedback from both professor and peers as we establish a community of writers in an intimate classroom setting. Texts for the course are The Art of Fiction by John Gardner (ISBN-10: 0679734031), Pep Talks, Warnings, and Screeds: Indispensable Wisdom and Cautionary Advice for Writers by George Singleton (ISBN-10: 1582975655), and Bird by Bird by Anne Lamott (ISBN-10: 0385480016).

Theater Courses

THEA 170 - Fundamentals of Acting

RicardoSection 001 - MWF 8:30 - 9:20 crn 53569
RicardoSection 002 - MWF 11:30 - 12:20 crn 53571
Counts as humanities, fine arts, or liberal arts elective, and for the Theater minor.

Everyone is a performer. Presentations, interviews, and, yes, even plays on stage are all performances. Acting is about communicating, and this class will help give you the tools to recognize and improve your own performance ability on the stage and in your life. We’ll also have a lot of fun. Through an exploration of major acting techniques, improvisation (yes, we will play improv games!), script analysis, and scene study, this class will make you more aware of how you use the tools of your voice and body to present a character or a persona. Never done any acting before? Great! Been in more plays than you can remember? Also great! This class is open to performers of all skill level and experience, and dreams of Hollywood or Broadway are not a prerequisite (although they won’t hurt, either). Join us for a fun way to strengthen your communication skills and gain a greater appreciation for and understanding of the performing arts. Required text and ISBN: Acting is Believing, 12th ed., Kenneth Stilson (ISBN: 9781285465050)

THEA 302 -  Theater History II:

PateMWF 10:30 - 11:20 crn 53596. Crosslisted with ENGL 302 above.

THEA 310 -  Reading and Performing Shakespeare 

Kilgore & PateMW 1:55 - 3:10  Crosslisted with ENGL 310 above.

THEA 370 - Intermediate Acting

RicardoMWF 9:30 - 10:20 crn 54409
Pre-req: THEA 170. Counts as humanities, fine arts, or liberal arts elective, and for the Theater minor.

Liberal Studies Courses

LBST 331 - Topics in Cultural Historiography (The Vietnam War)

McCoyTTH 9:25-10:40   crn 54309.Crosslisted with ENGL 429 above.

LBST 351 - Beyond the Classroom I

McCoyTTH 4:30 -5:45 crn 54489

This course revolves around you -- and what you want to do for your community. You'll learn what it takes to start a project in a community, and get it ready for implementation (and you'll learn, conveniently, about club budgets). Take this course to enhance what you already do in a USCB organization or see what you can do in the broader community -- everyone is welcome!

LBST/PHIL 363 - Philosophy of Film

Skeesonline crn 56511
The philosophy of film is a rapidly growing subfield of contemporary philosophy of art that has experienced a certain renaissance since the 1980s. In this course, we will address the philosophy of film topically. Topics will include the nature of film; film and authorship; film and emotion; films and narrators; and the social/political import of films. Finally, we will ask ourselves what we can learn from films.