Upcoming Courses

Fall and Summer 2017 Courses

Look below for extended course descriptions of upcoming English, Theater, and Liberal Studies courses written by the instructors who will teach them. See the First Year English course page for section descriptions for ENGL 101-106. Or visit the archive of past ETLS courses.

Fall English Courses

Great Gen Ed & Elective Courses requiring only 101 and 102, or equivalents, as pre-reqs: 200, 211, 222, 270, 289, 302, and 461.

Scheduling Notes: 200 and 270 are only offered in Fall semesters. Theory courses are only offered in Spring semesters. 287 and 288 will be offered in Spring 2018.

ENGL 180: Introduction to Film - McQuillen

Prereq: ENGL 101 with a grade of C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, and for the Interdisciplinary Film Minor.

“Film as dream, film as music. No art passes our conscience in the way film does, and goes directly to our feelings, deep down into the dark rooms of our souls.” ― Ingmar Bergman

“It's not what a movie is about, it's how it is about it.”  ― Roger Ebert

From Orson Welles’ groundbreaking Citizen Kane to Christopher Nolan’s mind-blowing Inception, film has a way to excite, entertain, and provoke like few visual mediums can. ENGL 180 is a general film appreciation class. It will introduce you to the basics of film production, narrative, style, editing, performance, sound, theory, and analysis, among other things. It will also expose you to a variety of films produced in the U. S. and other countries from the very beginnings of the medium in the 1890s, through the "Golden Age" of Hollywood in the 1930s-50s, and up to the present. So, be ready for a mix of classics and contemporary films, not just recent blockbusters. We will be viewing a wide range of films to see how they function as commercial / entertainment / artistic artifacts. This entails examining how we might place them within certain historical / cultural perspectives, and why certain ways of seeing films might be more or less important to us as viewers. By the end of the semester you will become adept at viewing films with an eye toward how they affect you as a person. This will also be a crucial class if you pursue the film minor.

ENGL 200: Introduction to English Studies - Barnes

Pre-reqs: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, and as a prerequisite for the English major/minor.

“I saw my life branching out before me like the green fig tree in the story. From the tip of every branch, like a fat purple fig, a wonderful future beckoned and winked. One fig was a husband and a happy home and children, and another fig was a famous poet and another fig was a brilliant professor, and another fig was Ee Gee, the amazing editor, and another fig was Europe and Africa and South America, and another fig was Constantin and Socrates and Attila and a pack of other lovers with queer names and offbeat professions, and another fig was an Olympic lady crew champion, and beyond and above these figs were many more figs I couldn’t quite make out.” —Sylvia Plath, The Bell Jar (1963)

“I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived.” —Henry David Thoreau, Walden (1854)

What does it mean to be an English major or an English minor? What can you do with this program of study? My favorite writers—Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Margaret Fuller—might hear Transcendentalist echoes reverberating in these questions and in the answers academics tend to pose nowadays. These Concordians would probably level serious critiques at our evermore sub-specializing field, but they would probably also be intrigued with our current desires for disciplinary “cohesion,” to invoke Walt Whitman, and interdisciplinary scholarship. For Emerson, “The American Scholar” is a person of action in the world. In this spirit, we’ll start by re-framing those first two provocations: not just what it might mean to be a major/minor or what you can do (modally inflected make-a-living verb) with a B.A. in English, but also what we do (philosophically, practically) as liberally educated people in the process. Thoreau might chime in, querying how this degree and this experience make us “live deliberately.” In this course, we will—to riff on the trees/woods/living deliberately conceit that runs amuck across this course, and to paraphrase Sylvia Plath’s Esther Greenwood—talk about how to pick good figs for ourselves.

English 200 is designed as an overview of English Studies. This course is geared toward majors and minors as an introduction to the program, to those considering pursuing a degree in English, as well as to anyone interested in reading, writing, research, argumentation, and education in the humanities. Together we will explore the history, present state of affairs, and potential futures of the discipline with an emphasis on the distinctive fields, practices, approaches, and terminology employed in the discipline. As we investigate sub-fields of English Studies, we will also hone your skills in the disciplinary fundamentals of critical thinking and reading, interpretation, research, and writing in various forms. Finally, we will discuss the diverse array of employment opportunities in the field.

ENGL 211.01: Editing and Publishing Practicum

Co-requisite: 200-level English course or permission of the instructor. 1 credit hour; may repeat this course up to 6 times.

Section 1 - The May River Review - Hoffer & Barnes

Are you interested in learning about editing and publishing? going to graduate school? finding an audience for the research that students do at this university? Yes?! Then English 211 is the perfect 1-credit-hour class for you. English 211 is designed to introduce students to important practices in interdisciplinary research through their work on the May River Review, USCB's interdisciplinary critical journal. Students will compose calls for essays, solicit and peer review submissions, update style guides, design page and journal layouts, copyedit articles accepted for publication, and organize strategies to publicize the journal in our community. Beyond offering firsthand experience for future internships and positions in editing and publishing, the ultimate goal of the course is the launch and promotion of the third issue and the production of the fourth. Don't miss the chance to be part of our staff and to put your signature on our journal! (no required course texts). Open to students from any major.

Section 2 - The PenMalphrus

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The Pen, a publication of the Society of Creative Writers, features fiction, poetry, creative non-fiction, short plays, and (if the budget allows) artwork created by USCB students. In this one hour credit course, students will solicit calls for creative writing, evaluate submissions, compose style guides, design page and journal layouts, copyedit pieces accepted for publication, and organize strategies to publicize and promote the journal on campus and in the community. Beyond offering you firsthand experience for future internships and positions in editing and publishing, the culmination of the course each semester will be completion and publication of the journal itself. Open to students from any major.

ENGL 215: Writing Center Practicum - Swofford

Pre-req: Instructor permission; may repeat this course up to 6 times.

This course explores the theories and practices that inform writing instruction in university writing centers (specifically, the writing center here at USCB). We are going to read about the “best practices” of teaching writing, observe one another as we tutor student writers, reflect on our own tutoring, and set goals for improving our tutoring practices. Students will collaborate to find solutions for common problems in tutoring sessions, hone their skills to best meet the needs of specific student populations, and work to promote writing across campus at USCB.  (Intended for current Writing Center tutors)

ENGL 222: Creative Writing Across the Curriculum - Malphrus

Pre-reqs: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective.

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English 222 is a sophomore level creative writing workshop designed to give students of all majors the platform to experiment with their creativity and curiosity using words. We'll dabble with fiction, poetry, playwriting, and creative nonfiction (true stories told well) – and we'll read examples of each. Your critical thinking skills and expertise as writer, reader, analyzer, and articulator will be polished. Ours will be an intimate classroom setting where students and professor alike give and receive feedback on creative works in progress. All you need are English 101 and a desire to mess around with words. 

ENGL 270: World Literature - McCoy

Pre-reqs: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, and as a prerequisite for the English major/minor. For ENGL majors, this course can substitute for ENGL 290.

 I am not born for one corner, the whole world is my native land. — Seneca

Travel the world without leaving the comforts of USCB in World Literature this fall! Spanning nearly every corner of the globe, this course emphasizes the study of texts and critical thinking about world culture through selected readings in major literary forms since 1700. Globetrot your way through the Enlightenment, Realism, Modernism, and Post-War/Post-Colonial eras while thinking about different cultures and ways of approaching life through literature. Authors from France, Italy, Russia, Germany, Spain, Denmark, Norway, India, United States, England, China, Japan, Argentina, Senegal, Romania, and Iran encourage us to engage in our world through unfamiliar and exotic eyes. We will be considering a variety of literary forms: poetry, short stories, plays, novels, and graphic novels. We will focus on ideas of representation (character, setting, and historical context) as well as how to approach cultural difference. Open to all majors.

ENGL 289: English Literature II - Hoffer

Pre-reqs: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, and as a prerequisite for the English major/minor. You don't need to take English Literature I before II.

Pasts, Presents, Futures. ENGL 289 is open to students from all majors and offers a survey (broad overview) of major writers and works in the British literary tradition from the 18th to the 21st century. Our approach to this undertaking will be to examine, and to interrogate, some of the very principles that underpin the rationale for this type of course in English Studies. This means we will think critically about not only the literature we study but also about such terms as "literary history," "tradition," "convention," "canon," and "period." We will achieve this by focusing on the ways authors and texts engage with time, representing various perspectives on pasts, presents, and futures in their form and content. Along the way, we will study important disciplinary terminology and encounter major literary and cultural movements—Romantic, Victorian, Modern, and Postmodern—, exploring the contexts as well as the texts that have come to define them. Required texts: The Broadview Anthology of British Literature: Concise Volume B, 2nd edition (ISBN 9781554811335) and one contemporary British novel of your choice from a list of selections.

ENGL/THEA 302: Theater History II - Pate

Pre-reqs: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, and as a POST-1800 course for the English major or minor, or for the Theater minor. You don't need to take Theater History I before II.

This course follows three major strains of influence in Western theater since 1800: the dramatic, the lyric, and the epic. We’ll see how realism transforms from radical and scandalous experiment to oppressive and banal norm. We’ll explore the various (and variously successful) attempts to translate artistic movements such as symbolism, expressionism, and surrealism onto the stage. We’ll discuss the political motives behind Epic Theater’s desire to continuously remind the audience of the fictive nature of theater instead of allowing them to be drawn into the performance. We’ll also explore how popular theater forms ranging from musical theater to melodrama respond to and help shape the more avant-garde theatrical movements. Reading assignments in this class often encourage students to use their textbooks and any other resources they can find to learn about a particular person or topic rather than provide a range of pages to read. The class culminates in a research paper in which students identify and engage with some ongoing discourse surrounding one of the topics or texts we cover. And don’t let the 2 fool you; there’s no need to take Theater History I before taking this class.

ENGL 402: Tudor Literature - Kilgore

Pre-req: one 200-level lit course or instructor’s consent. Counts as a PRE-1800 course for the the English major or minor.elizabeth.jpg

Writing the Queen. In 1588, Queen Elizabeth, leading her troops into battle against the Spaniards, conceded she had “the body but of a weak and feeble woman,” but insisted she had “the heart and stomach of a king, and a king of England too.” If the Renaissance is an international movement of arts and letters, then the flowering of arts of letters in England under Elizabeth is a nationalistic enterprise. It also is gendered. The virgin queen, Elizabeth, is the author, monarch, subject, or object of much of the writing we’ll read, leading to the bizarre circumstance that poems about shepherds singing to shepherdesses are very often poems about domestic and foreign policy. But they’re also really good poems.  

In this course, you’ll become familiar with the major non-dramatic genres and modes of Renaissance literature: treatise, lyric, pastoral, romance, and epic. You’ll sample from a variety of important sixteenth century prose writings (including Machiavelli, Castiglione, and Tyndale), and then focus on the poetry of Christopher Marlowe, Edmund Spenser, Philip and Mary Sidney, and Aemilia Lanyer — all of which have Queen Elizabeth inspiring and haunting their pages. We’ll also read the poetry of Elizabeth herself and the love letters her dad (Henry VIII) wrote to her mom (Anne Boleyn). Longer readings include Book One of Spenser’s The Faerie Queene, Philip Sidney’s Astrophil and Stella, Marlowe’s translation of Ovid’s Elegies, Lanyer’s Salve Deus Rex Judaeorum (don’t worry, it’s in English), but even these longer readings are relatively short: we’ll need to read them carefully.  Attendance mandatory, discussion encouraged, presentations given, frequent writing designed to lead to a researched argumentative essay of 9-10 pages, final exam, sense of humor, and spirit of inquiry essential.  

Required texts with ISBNs: Sir Philip Sidney: The Major Works (Oxford UP, 2002, 9780199538416); Christopher Marlowe, The Complete Poems and Translations (Penguin, 2007, 9780143104957); Edmund Spenser’s Poetry (Norton, 1992, 9780393962994); Renaissance Women Poets (Penguin, 2001, 9780140424096); Elizabeth I and Her Age, edited by Felch and Stump (Norton, 2008, 9780393928228). Online texts are inadequate substitutes for the required texts. For more details, email me at kilgorer [at] uscb.edu.

ENGL 415: The English Novel - Hoffer

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Pre-req: one 200-level lit course or instructor’s consent. Counts as a POST-1800 course for the English major or minor.

Novel Identities. For over two centuries, the novel has arguably been the most popular form of literature. This was not, however, always the case. Where did the novel come from, and what various shapes has it taken since its inception? How did it achieve the level of predominance it has today? Many scholars have proposed that the rise of the novel is tied to evolving conceptions of the individual and his/her place in the world (socially, psychologically, etc.) and argue that the novel has unique means for portraying and constructing this complex subject, even beyond the page. In this course, we will investigate this hypothesis by taking as our focus a group of novels—each named after its principal character—that pays special attention to the tribulations and triumphs of these eponymous characters. Each representing a different subgenre of the novel, these texts will allow us to trace the evolution of the form from the 18th through the early 20th centuries and to examine the various ways the individual is depicted and defined. Special attention will be paid to elements of form and genre, especially point of view, and to cultural conceptions of identity, particularly as they pertain to individualism, class, and gender.

ENGL 425B: American Novel Since 1914 - Malphrus

Pre-req: one 200-level lit course or instructor’s consent. Counts as a POST-1800 course for the the English major or minor.Image result for one flew over the cuckoo's nest quotes

SURVIVAL: The beginning of World War I has been a traditional literary place mark, and here we are 100 years later looking back on the struggles and triumphs of our nation as revealed in the texts of our time – and the time of our forbears for the last generations. Of the myriad ways in which we could view such a wide swath of literary output, this course will focus through the thematic lens of survival (in its many nuances). Our primary texts will be Ernest Hemingway’s A Farewell to Arms“the classic novel of love during wartime”; The Color Purple by Alice Walker—Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award Winner;  It Can’t Happen Here by Sinclair Lewis—“an alarming, eerily timeless look at how fascism could take hold in America” (published in 1935); The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay by Michael Chabon—“an American epic of two boy geniuses”;  As I Lay Dying,” by William Faulkner—which “ranges in mood from dark comedy to deep pathos”; and One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest by Ken Kesey—whose protagonist Randle Patrick McMurphy is “a boisterous, brawling, fun-loving rebel who swaggers into the world of a mental hospital and takes over.”

ENGL 429: Topics in American Lit: Historical Imaginaries - Barnes

Pre-req: one 200-level lit course or instructor’s consent. Counts as a POST-1800 course for the the English major or minor.

Ralph Waldo Emerson once wrote that “[a]ll history becomes subjective.” For Emerson, History with a capital H exists in each person’s present-tense imagination, not as objective fact. “Every mind,” he writes, “must know the whole lesson for itself—must go over the whole ground. What it does not see, what it does not live, it will not know. What the former age has epitomized into a formula or rule for manipular convenience, it will lose all the good of verifying for itself, by means of the wall of that rule. Somewhere, sometime, it will demand and find compensation for that loss, by doing the work itself.” In his biography of Nathaniel Hawthorne, Henry James muses along similar lines that “it takes a great deal of history to produce a little literature.” We’ll grapple with these big-picture ideas throughout this course by studying cultural memory as we encounter it in historical literature: at two removes. All of the texts that we’ll read dramatize earlier historical moments in America’s past. We’ll discuss these texts as works of art, but we’ll also study the periods when they were published and set. Our project will be to trace the complex historical imaginaries that unfold in American letters across what many critics now call “the long nineteenth century.”

We’ll devote most of our time to novels: Susanna Rowson’s Reuben and Rachel; or, A Tale of Old Times (published in 1798; the history of a family, one branch of Christopher Columbus’s tree, over ten generations) or Catharine Sedgwick’s Hope Leslie (published in 1827; set in 1643); Nathaniel Hawthorne’s, The Scarlet Letter (published in 1850; set between 1642 and 1649); Frances Ellen Watkins Harper’s, Iola Leroy; or, Shadows Uplifted (published in 1892; set during and immediately after the Civil War); Toni Morrison’s Beloved (published in 1987; set after the Civil War); Edith Wharton’s, The Age of Innocence (published 1920; set circa 1870s–1880s); and Edward Bellamy’s Looking Backward: 2000–1887 (published in 1888; set in 2000). We’ll ground our studies in local literary history with chapters from what many dub the Gone with the Wind of Beaufort: Francis Griswold’s A Sea Island Lady (published in 1939; set in the Lowcountry between the Civil War and the Second World War). We’ll contextualize this sequence with poems, short stories, and excerpts from one of the most famous historical fiction series (James Fenimore Cooper’s Leatherstocking Tales) that take memory as their subject. Here are some of the other poets and texts we’ll likely cover: Emma Lazarus, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, and Adrienne Rich; Washington Irving’s, “Rip Van Winkle” (published in 1819; set before and immediately after the Revolutionary War) and Catharine Maria Sedgwick’s, “A Reminiscence of Federalism” (published in 1835; set in the 1790s).

 *An alternative topics course on feminism and joy in American literature is percolating. Please contact me if that sounds like your cup of tea. If there is serious student interest, I’d love to write and run this course instead. :D

ENGL 453: Development of the English Language -  Swofford

Pre-req: one 200-level lit course or instructor’s consent.

History and Development of English: We hear many complaints that “texting is ruining the English language.” Such complaints are not new. In 1387, Ranulph Higden fretted about the influence of the Danes and Normans on English and the ways their “chattering” brought bad habits into the language. It’s clear that English has always been changing, and has, in fact, changed dramatically enough that we as Modern English speakers can barely understand those who first began to call their language “English” and created written records of poems such as Beowulf. In this course, we will do a broad sweep of the English language’s history, focusing on the changes in the structure of the language, but also the stories of the cultures and speakers who make it such a rich and fascinating subject. The course will balance attention to the technicalities of historical linguistic developments and serious engagement with theories of language diversity and change—including how “standard language” and “grammar instruction” developed in the history of English and how language ideologies shape the history we tell. Languages are inextricably connected to the people who speak them, so we’ll be discussing attitudes about dialects (especially local dialects/languages like Southern English, African-American English, and Gullah), and we’ll work through tricky questions about how all of this knowledge should affect the ways that we teach and learn English and English/Language Arts.

Along the way, we will also address a variety of intriguing linguistic questions such as: Where did the pronoun she come from? (And why is it the Word of the Millennium?) When did double negation become non-standard, and who first said (erroneously) that two negatives make a positive? Why is colonel spelled the way it is and yet pronounced “kernel”? How did English spelling become, according to linguist Mario Pei, the “world’s most awesome mess”? Why and how do “living” languages change? Bring a genuine curiosity about the details of language and how language changes, and a willingness to dig into the messy business of understanding how the English language came to be.

ENGL 461: Writing in the Health Professions - Kilgore

Pre-reqs: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, or for the English minor and major and as a writing concentration course.

Preparation for and practice in types of writing important to those working within the health care and health promotion industry, from brief letters to formal articles and reports.

ENGL 464: Poetry Workshop - Malphrus

Pre-req: one 200-level literature course, or instructor’s consent. Counts toward the major or minor and toward the Writing Concentration. With permission from the instructor, can be taken twice for credit.

"A poet is someone for whom words have the maximum of significance," said James Dickey. If words do indeed matter to you in this way, then pack up your muses and join us for a semester of learning the art and craft of poetry writing. English 464 is a workshop formatted course designed to expand awareness of, appreciation for, and ability to create works of poetry.
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The class is writing intensive with the goal of improving all writing and critical thinking skills. In addition, this course offers global perspectives of poetry by focusing on writers from around the world. Students will receive feedback from both professor and peers as we establish a community of writers in an intimate classroom setting. Further, each student will create a variety of original poetry, including the following forms: cinquain, couplet, quatrain, sonnet, villanelle, sestina, haiku, and blank verse.

ENGL 466: Writing Internship - Various

Pre-req: departmental permission.

Internship in writing, editing, proofreading, and/or research with a community organization or publication, with training in writing effectively for diverse audiences in a workplace setting. If you are interested, contact Dr. Kilgore or Dr. Swofford.

Fall Theater Courses

THEA 170: Fundamentals of Acting - Ricardo

No Pre-reqs. Counts as humanities, fine arts, or liberal arts elective, and for the Theater minor.

You don’t have to want to be a great actor to benefit from an acting class. The skills and techniques we cover—everything from healthy vocal practices to script analysis and greater awareness of physicality and movement—apply to a wide array of disciplines, careers, and other opportunities. This class starts with the basics of Stanislavski-based acting methodology, the standard in American actor training for over a century. Our work builds toward a final project in which students perform for the class small group scenes from major plays. Students are also asked to write a final paper in which they discuss how the skills they learn in the acting classroom apply to their interests and aspirations outside of theater.

THEA 200: Understanding and Appreciation of Theater - Pate

No Pre-reqs. Counts as humanities, fine arts, or liberal arts elective.

In an increasingly digital and media-saturated world, does theater still matter? This course explores the history and practice of theater and its relationship to broader cultural and social issues to empower students to answer that question (and, of course, to better appreciate theater). We’ll look at Western theater’s roots as a practice of civic engagement, learn about how theater is made today and the various roles that contribute to its creation, and try to understand what theater’s place can be in broader discourse. In studying theater practices as varying as community theater, Broadway musicals, and Southeast Asian dance dramas, students will cultivate the tools needed to assess the role that theater plays in shaping not only our perception of the world but also the world itself.

THEA 201: Intro to Script Analysis - Ricardo

Pre-reqs: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities, fine arts, or liberal arts elective, and for the Theater minor.

Is it a literature class? Or is it a theater class? Yes! In this class, we’ll read several plays and discuss techniques for analyzing them to pull out such elements as tone, character, and theme, much as you would do for any close reading work in a literature class. However, our analysis will maintain a specialized focus on applications for performance. In other words, we’ll constantly ask how our close readings might be useful to an actor, a director, or a set or costume designer. We’ll also learn how to do historical and critical research to learn about a play’s production history and the discourse it has provoked. Our writing assignments will focus on how to communicate our analysis and research in the way that will be most accessible and useful to varying audiences including theater practitioners and theater patrons.

THEA 220: Theater Laboratory - Pate

Pre-req: Instructor permission. 1 credit course. Supervised participation in theatre production. No formal class meetings. May be repeated for up to 8 credits.

THEA/ENGL 302: Theater History II - Pate

Pre-reqs: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, and as a POST-1800 course for the English major or minor, or for the Theater minor.

This course follows three major strains of influence in Western theater since 1800: the dramatic, the lyric, and the epic. We’ll see how realism transforms from radical and scandalous experiment to oppressive and banal norm. We’ll explore the various (and variously successful) attempts to translate artistic movements such as symbolism, expressionism, and surrealism onto the stage. We’ll discuss the political motives behind Epic Theater’s desire to continuously remind the audience of the fictive nature of theater instead of allowing them to be drawn into the performance. We’ll also explore how popular theater forms ranging from musical theater to melodrama respond to and help shape the more avant-garde theatrical movements. Reading assignments in this class often encourage students to use their textbooks and any other resources they can find to learn about a particular person or topic rather than provide a range of pages to read. The class culminates in a research paper in which students identify and engage with some ongoing discourse surrounding one of the topics or texts we cover. And don’t let the 2 fool you; there’s no need to take Theater History I before taking this class.

Fall Liberal Studies Courses

LBST 250 - Liberal Studies Internship - McCoy

Pre-req: Liberal Studies major or minor only, completion of LBST 297, consent of instructor.

Provides students with the opportunity to apply interdisciplinary research skills across culturally diverse populations in a professional setting. Minimum requirement of 150 service hours.

LBST 297 - Interdisciplinary Research Methods - McCoy

Pre-req: 45 hours of General Studies and acceptance into the LBST program

Introduction into individualized study including initial proposal development, review of courses and bibliography.

LBST 397: Readings in Philosophy - McCoy

For ENGL majors, this course will satisfy the program requirement for a PHIL course.

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“Never be afraid to raise your voice for honesty and truth and compassion against injustice and lying and greed.” - William Faulkner

This course will examine key texts and ideas that form a variety of ideologies regarding social protest. We will study social protest from a mostly American perspective, but recognition and assessment of global instances of protest will be included and encouraged. The motivations behind social protest, particularly those related to anti-war protests in American history, will be a large focus of this course, but a comprehensive look at civil disobedience will be included. Current social movements may be assessed as comparative instances of protest in conjunction with our historical and philosophical survey of social protests throughout the US and beyond.

BOOKS: We Who Dared to Say No to War (Polner & Woods, 2008; ISBN: 1568583850); The Art of Moral Protest: Culture, Biography and Creativity in Social Movements  (Jasper, 1997-9; ISBN: 0226394816).

LBST 497 - Seminar in Liberal Studies among the Disciplines - McCoy

Prereq: Senior standing in Liberal Studies or consent of the instructor.

Summer 2017 Courses English Courses

ENGL 439: Selected Topics - Fantasy Literature - Hoffer

Full Summer Term 2017

“There are other worlds than these…” - Stephen King, The Dark Tower: The Gunslinger

The publication of the first Harry Potter and Game of Thrones novels at the turn of the 21st century inaugurated a renaissance for fantasy literature in popular culture. However, fantastical figures and realms have enlivened fiction since antiquity! In this course, we will study major representative texts of the fantasy literary tradition in order to explore the forms and techniques of the genre—in other words, the roots and inspirations for many of the stories we cherish (and obsess over!) today. Together, we will identify the various structures, tropes, and themes that characterize this canon as well as what happens when authors depart from these paradigms.

We will take as our focus two of the central tenets of fantasy literature: the concepts of “world-building” and “suspension of disbelief.” These broad principles will allow us to engage with other matters common to fantasy fiction, such as metamorphosis, identity formation, the journey, the battle of good vs. evil, heroism, and more. Our readings will include works by Carroll, Baum, Lewis, Tolkien, LeGuin, Rowling, and others. Students will have the opportunity to vote on the 21st c. text we will study in the last week of the term as well as to present on their favorite fantasy in an alternative medium—TV, film, comic, gaming, cosplay, etc.

ENGL 439 counts as a POST-1800 or English Elective toward the major or minor, and can be taken multiple times under different course titles. It may also fulfill Humanities or Liberal Arts general education requirements. Students from all majors are welcome! Prerequisites: one ENGL course at the 200-level OR instructor permission. This is a 10-week USCB summer term course, meaning we will meet once a week from May 31st-July 28th. Class will meet on Wednesdays from 1:00-4:30pm (with breaks). Feel free to contact Dr. Hoffer at Hoffer [at] uscb.edu with any questions or for information on financial aid!

ENGL 463: Business Writing - Duffy

Full Summer Term 2017

This course is designed to introduce students to strategies and techniques they can use to write functional, useful documents in business. The goals of the course are to develop those communication and writing skills for efficacy in the workplace. As no single strategy or formula can be used in all occasions or at all times, audience analysis, critical thinking, and investigation of rhetorical situations will be important for devising methods for building situational responses. Students will learn to be flexible with style and content within the somewhat strict forms of professional communication. Students will conduct library research and learn to use it persuasively and argumentatively in group and individual projects, generating professional quality information in letter and memo (correspondence), and technical report formats. 

Summer 2017 Liberal Studies Courses

LBST 250 - Liberal Studies Internship - McCoy

Pre-req: Liberal Studies major or minor only, completion of LBST 297, consent of instructor.

Provides students with the opportunity to apply interdisciplinary research skills across culturally diverse populations in a professional setting. Minimum requirement of 150 service hours.

LBST 297 - Interdisciplinary Research Methods - McCoy

Pre-req: 45 hours of General Studies and acceptance into the LBST program

Introduction into individualized study including initial proposal development, review of courses and bibliography.

LBST 497 - Seminar in Liberal Studies among the Disciplines - McCoy

Prereq: Senior standing in Liberal Studies or consent of the instructor.