Upcoming Courses

Spring 2018 Courses

Look below for extended course descriptions of upcoming English, Theater, and Liberal Studies courses written by the instructors who will teach them. Visit the archive of past ETLS courses.

Spring English Courses

english1.pngEnglish 211-001: Editing & Publishing Practicum: The Pen—  Malphrus

co-requisite: 200-level English course or permission of the instructor. 1 credit hour; may repeat this course up to 6 times

"Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing." ~Benjamin Franklin

The Pen, a publication of the USCB Society of Creative Writers, features fiction, poetry, creative non-fiction, short plays, and artwork created by USCB students. In this one hour credit course, students will solicit calls for creative works, evaluate submissions, design page and journal layouts, copyedit pieces accepted for publication, and organize strategies to publicize and promote the journal on campus and in the community. Beyond offering you firsthand experience for future internships and positions in editing and publishing, the culmination of the course each semester will be completion and publication of the journal itself.

english2.png

English 211-002: Editing & Publishing Practicum: May River Review – Barnes & Hoffer

co-requisite: 200-level English course or permission of the instructor. 1 credit hour; may repeat this course up to 6 times

Are you interested in learning about editing and publishing? going to graduate school? finding an audience for the research that students do at this university? Yes?! Then English 211 is the perfect 1-credit-hour class for you. English 211 is designed to introduce students to important practices in interdisciplinary research through their work on the May River Review, USCB's interdisciplinary critical journal. Students will compose calls for essays, solicit and peer review submissions, update style guides, design page and journal layouts, copyedit articles accepted for publication, and organize strategies to publicize the journal in our community. Beyond offering firsthand experience for future internships and positions in editing and publishing, the ultimate goal of the course is the launch and promotion of the third issue and the production of the fourth. Don't miss the chance to be part of our staff and to put your signature on our journal! (no required course texts)

English 222: Creative Writing Across the Curriculum—Malphrus

Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective

"Writing is an exploration. You start from nothing and learn as you go."    ~E.L. Doctorow

Ready to explore? Then this is the course for you. English 222 is a sophomore level creative writing workshop designed to give students of all majors the platform to experiment with their creativity and curiosity using words. We'll dabble with fiction, poetry, playwriting, and creative nonfiction (true stories told well) – and we'll read examples of each.  Your critical thinking skills and expertise as writer, reader, analyzer, and articulator will be polished.  Ours will be an intimate classroom setting where students and professor alike give and receive feedback on creative works in progress.  All you need are English 101 and a desire to mess around with words.

English 287: American Literature Survey—Barnes

Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, and as a pre-requisite for the English major/minor.

What does it mean to be an American? to represent life in the United States in 1776? 1850? 1929? 2018? In this survey, we'll develop an encompassing reading knowledge of U.S. Literature and complement that reading knowledge with an appreciation for literary historical periods and contexts. Our survey will cover the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, including the nationalist period; Romantic and Renaissance Americana; Civil-War fiction, nonfiction, and poetry; realism; naturalism; modernism, and post-modernism; among other intellectual movements. As we move from cultural epoch to cultural epoch, we'll see writers contend—often self-consciously—with Americanness in past, present, and future tenses. I'll emphasize watershed moments in American history/literary history in lectures and discussions, and you'll be held accountable for identifying authors and texts with their respective periods. We'll capitalize on our wide chronological scope and use it to study the ways American writers remember and revise one another. By stressing American writers' revisionist impulses, we'll also ensure that our understanding of U.S. letters is diverse. Our emphasis on memory will challenge us to think critically about representations of race, gender, and class, but also our ever-unfolding identities as local, national, and global citizens. Our course texts will include The Norton Anthology of American Literature (Shorter Edition Volumes 1 & 2; 978-0393930580) and digital archives/materials available on Blackboard.

ENGL 288: English Literature I –Galloway Holmes.

Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, and as a pre-requisite for the English major/minor.

This course will cover over one thousand years of English literature, beginning with some of the oldest known documents written in the English language.  Our literary journey will begin with warriors battling monsters in the pagan world of Beowulf, and end with the fall of man in John Milton's Paradise Lost.   We will read texts by some of the biggest names in British literature to include Chaucer and Shakespeare, as well as a representative sample of lesser-known writers such as Marie de France, Edmund Spenser, and Christopher Marlowe.  As we read, we will track the evolution of the English language from Old to Middle to Modern English.   As we read, we will explore how literature functions as a vehicle to relate universal truths about the human experience, and we will examine how texts attempt to answer the question of "what does it mean to be human?"  We will explore dichotomies in texts dealing with concepts such as fate and fortune, good and evil, and pride and humility.  Heroes and villains will take the stage, as well as priests, prostitutes, and knights of King Arthur's court.  The required text for this course will be the ninth edition of the three volume The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Volumes A, B, & C (ISBN 978-0-393-91300-2).

Image3English 289 English Literature II—Hoffer

Pre-reqs: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, and as a prerequisite for the English major/minor. You don't need to take English Literature I before II.

Pasts, Presents, Futures. ENGL 289 is open to students from all majors and offers a survey (broad overview) of major writers and works in the British literary tradition from the 18th to the 21st century. Our approach to this undertaking will be to examine, and to interrogate, some of the very principles that underpin the rationale for this type of course in English Studies. This means we will think critically about not only the literature we study but also about such terms as "literary history," "tradition," "convention," "canon," and "period." We will achieve this by focusing on the ways authors and texts engage with time, representing various perspectives on pasts, presents, and futures in their form and content. Along the way, we will study important disciplinary terminology and encounter major literary and cultural movements—Romantic, Victorian, Modern, and Postmodern—, exploring the contexts as well as the texts that have come to define them. Required texts: The Broadview Anthology of British Literature: Concise Volume B, 2nd edition (ISBN 9781554811335) and one contemporary British novel of your choice from a list of selections.

ENGL 301/THEA 301: Theater History IPate

Counts as humanities, fine arts, or liberal arts elective, and for the Theater minor.

Gods. Demons. Kings. The stages and pages of Western Theater History from the ancient Greeks to 1800 were filled with ritual and debate, religion and politics, economics and culture. In this course, we'll examine the development of theatrical texts and practices and their place in shaping social and aesthetic discourse. Part dramatic literature, part cultural history, this class digs deep into texts through close reading while also sending up a periscope to look around at all the other theatrical practices happening around the written word. We'll read about the impact of historical context on theater and about theater's impact on history. We'll read plays ranging from the Greek classics to medieval mystery plays to the Renaissance throughout Europe and through the Enlightenment. And, perhaps most importantly, we'll explore the theories of theater practitioners throughout history, in their own words, of how and why to create theater. Open to students from any major.

ENGL 401 Chaucer: Medieval Romance, Disney, and Representation [UPDATED]—Kilgore

Courses_Kilgore_401.jpgPre-requisite: one 200-level literature course or instructor's consent. Counts toward the major or minor [Pre-1800]. Works for the Interdisciplinary Minor in Film Studies.

American popular culture has a long, sometimes frivolous, and often troubling, attachment to aspects of Geoffrey Chaucer’s work, courtly love, and European medieval culture more broadly, and this is represented in part in the films and parks of Disney. The castles, the princesses, and the structure of stories that echo those of the medieval romance (roman = story) of knights and ladies: the world that falls apart and gets put back together. We’ll explore Chaucer, related medieval texts, and Disney films (my lists are still evolving as the genre is evolving, see below) and scholarship and journalism about both. Discussion encouraged, papers written, public-facing project done. Spirit of inquiry is essential.

Our method for the course will be, while we explore the genre and structure of Chaucer’s works and medieval literary romance, to attend to the representations of masculinity, femininity, queer identity, race, and nationhood in these texts and films—while exploring the representations of the medieval in our times (that is, the medievalisms). Some questions to pursue: Who is represented in these texts/films? What does it mean (what good is it) to read medieval tales that include sexual assault and maltreatment of non-Christian others in 2018? In what ways has Disney’s treatment of the medieval been salutary? liberating? anodyne? destructive? fun? In what ways is Moana a knight? In what ways did Walt Disney want to be King Arthur, and make Walt Disney World / “the Florida Project” to be Camelot all over again? Should I take my son to Disney for a knight makeover to inspire his pursuit of virtue, or would I be setting him up with either a) impossible expectations, or b) an unhealthy understanding of gender? In what ways is romance reality? In what ways is this material effectively taught to high school students?

Required texts: The Norton Anthology of English Literature, 9th ed., Volume A (9780393912494); Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales (Norton, 9780393925876) and Troilus and Criseyde (Norton, 9780393927559) GET THESE EDITIONS; further materials on Blackboard. The films I want you to watch in full will be on Library reserve. Tentative reading/watching list: Selections from The Canterbury Tales and Troilus and Criseyde, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, some poetry by Marie de France, and pieces of Malory’s Death of Arthur. And we’ll also screen all or part of Snow White (1937), Cinderella (1950), The Sword in the Stone (1963), Robin Hood (1973), A Knight in Camelot (1998, live action, starring Whoopi Goldberg), A Knight’s Tale (2001, Heath Ledger), Moana (2016), The Florida Project (2017), and yes, some of the Star Wars oeuvre. (And I’m open to suggestions.) The Medieval POC Tumblr. YouTube videos of rides at Disney parks. For more details, email me at kilgorer [at] uscb.edu.

English 428: African American Literature Seminar—Barnes

Pre-requisite: one 200-level literature course or instructor's consent. Counts toward the major or minor. [Post-1800]

"Perhaps, as we say in America, I wanted to find myself. This is an interesting phrase, not current as far as I know in the language of any other people, which certainly does not mean what it says but betrays a nagging suspicion that something has been misplaced. I think now that if I had had any intimation that the self I was going to find would turn out to be only the same self from which I had spent so much time in flight, I would have stayed at home. But, again, I think I knew, at the very bottom of my heart, exactly what I was doing when I took the boat for France."

—James Baldwin, Giovanni's Room

We'll spend our time this spring studying works by and/or about African American expatriates. Far from even attempting to cover breadth in this seminar, we'll focus our reading on a range of texts that take belonging as their subject. We'll explore letters, poems, novels, travelogues, autobiographies, short stories, and works dubbed as "avant-garde" for the ways that they defy these generic boundaries/categories. In fact, our course texts represent expatriation as an act that variously promises personal and political liberation; collective isolation; creative resistance and restoration; historic empowerment; artistic experimentation; love of one's self and of one's country, and the unflinching criticism necessary for both of those last two things. Our texts map generations of soul-searching types whose narratives of life in Denmark and Cuba, in Northern Ireland and the South of France, in Naples and (of course!) Paris, reflect complex states of expatriation—sometimes ebbing from insistent hope to disorientation/displacement, from homesickness to wanderlustful joy in just a handful of pages. We'll wonder over why certain places became so important to so many artists at certain cultural moments—and how these patterns abroad affect the ways critics popularize and canonize African American literature in different periods. We'll read beautiful books (some you'll surely reach for as favorites long after our course is over: Quicksand by Nella Larsen! Giovanni's Room by James Baldwin!). But to do this well, we'll also listen to music and look at drawings, paintings, and other visual arts. Our reading list is a work in progress. It will encompass a range of nineteenth- and twentieth-century writers. I'm considering some pieces and some full-length works by Frederick Douglass, Booker T. Washington, W.E.B. DuBois, Anna Julia Cooper, Langston Hughes, Jessie Redmon Fauset, Gwendolyn Bennett, Nella Larsen, James Baldwin, Richard Wright, Nina Simone, Angela Davis, and Andrea Lee. I'm happy to collect requests and suggestions from interested students!

ENGL B439/LBST B331: Social Justice & the Chinese Cultural Revolution (3)—McCoy

Pre-requisite: one 200-level literature course or instructor's consent. Counts toward the major or minor.

What does social justice look like in the middle of a cultural revolution? What does the distribution of wealth, opportunities, and privileges look like in Communist China?

To find out, we're going to learn a little about Chinese history. We'll read a comprehensive (epic!) biography on the legendary Chairman Mao, and we'll look at contemporary Chinese art – dissenting and non – and try to wrap our heads about our mystical and mammoth neighbor to the East! Come check out China this spring!

ENGL 442: Principles of Modern Literary Theory—Once Upon a Theory—Hoffer

Image4Pre-requisite: one 200-level literature course or instructor's consent. Counts toward the major or minor. Meets the major's literary theory requirement.

Theory is often described as a lens: a distinct set of terms and ideas that, when "put on" like a pair of glasses, enables a different way of seeing and understanding the world—or, when it comes to literary theory, a different way of seeing and understanding texts.  Theory has a long history reaching all the way back to antiquity, but the 20th century was what many consider the heyday of literary theory as one after another "school" emerged and transformed the way scholars think about literature and culture. In this course, we will try on many different lenses as we study the development and nature of several major modern theories.  The course has two principal goals:  1.) to expose you to a number of critical theories through a study of the terminology, concepts, and primary texts by the theorists who helped to define those perspectives, and 2.) to enable you to use these theories in order to formulate your own interpretive arguments about texts. The focus of our theoretical applications for in-class discussion and writing assignments —the playground upon which we will enact these theoretical principles—will be the fairy tale tradition. Through our examination of classic folklore and fairy tales as well as their contemporary adaptations (many of these revisions shaped by the very theories we will encounter), we will practice using theory to create literary criticism. We will investigate the types of readings available through each theoretical perspective; explore how different theories can be applied to a single text to allow for a rich diversity of meaning; and discover the ways that theories can be blended together to form still further innovations in interpretation.  Required texts: Critical Theory Today, 3rd ed.(ISBN 9780415506755), Critical Theory: A Reader for Literary and Cultural Studies (ISBN 9780199797776 ) and The Classic Fairy Tales (ISBN 9780393972771).

English 462: Technical Writing—Duffy

Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, or for the English minor and major and as a writing concentration course.

Recent graduates find that communication in the workplace is often different than expectations would lead one to believe. The variety of methods, circumstances, and audiences dictate different needs for communication methodology. Technical Writing is more than writing about technology; it is writing technically to analyze, explain, and instruct audiences up and down the management chain internally, as well as externally. Projects in technical writing will practice both short- and long-term efforts, in both individual and group work settings. The text for the course will be the Handbook of Technical Writing by Gerald J. Alred. Open to students from any major.

ENGL470: Teaching of Writing—Swofford

Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher—or consent of instructor. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, or for the English minor and major and as a writing concentration course.

What does "good" writing instruction look like? Can we really teach writing? How can we know if our own writing is "good"? In this class, we'll examine these questions, among others, as we consider the methods for teaching writing to students at a variety of levels. This course explores the theories and practices that inform writing instruction in K-12 classrooms, university classrooms, and writing centers. We are going to read about the "best practices" of teaching writing, watch experienced teachers guide student writers, and try out the things we've read and seen as we teach writing ourselves. In other words, the goal of this course is to provide students with both a strong theoretical foundation in writing pedagogy and the first-hand experience to put that theory into practice. Recommended for prospective K-12 and university writing teachers, writing center tutors, and English majors. Students who pass this course with a B or higher are eligible to apply to be paid tutors in the Writing Center.

ENGL472: Cinema – McQuillen

Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher—or consent of instructor. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, or for the English minor and major

Probe the depths of some of cinema's most influential and thought-provoking films!

Cinema will provide students with an in-depth and focused study of 4 to 5 films from select genres and directors. Students will increase their film vocabulary with explorations in genre study and core concepts in popular film theories, such as auteur and feminist film theory. We will discuss the likes of Laura Mulvey, Roger Ebert, Susan Sontag, Andre Bazin, and Sergei Eisenstein. We will sift through a variety of articles dealing and discussing our films and see if they take us down a road of enlightenment or into a land of confusion. We plan to ask some hard questions about films and about our own interpretations of these films. Let's challenge each other, including myself, to find out what these films are trying to say. Is Ridley Scott's Alien really about the perversion of sex and birth or nothing more than a haunted house in space movie? Let's really sink our teeth into it!

Students will write traditional essays and participate in group presentations based on genre and theory readings to lead class discussions. We will watch films and then watch scenes from those select films two or three times.

Spring Liberal Studies Courses

LBST B297: Interdisciplinary Research Methods (3)—McCoy

Open to Liberal Studies majors & interdisciplinary minors. Online.

Introduction into individualized study including initial proposal development, review of courses and bibliography.

LBST B351: Beyond the Classroom Community Project I (3)—McCoy

Open to all majors at all levels. Online.

Do you want to do some "service learning" but be more of the inventor than the participant? Seniors! Want to graduate with a bang and leave your mark on USCB? Other-classmen! Want to create a project idea that you could implement in the fall? TAKE THIS CLASS!

"Beyond the Classroom I" requires you, the student, to design a community project, individually or in a small group. The project must respond to a community need, involve participants in reciprocal activities, provide opportunities for student's on-going reflection, and evaluate the activity.  Explore the opportunities, strategies, successes and pitfalls of service learning in higher education from a theoretical perspective.  In Fall 2018, you'll have the opportunity to apply these ideas toward your own service learning project proposal, in LBST B352.

LBST B331/ENGL B439: Social Justice & the Chinese Cultural Revolution (3)—McCoy

What does social justice look like in the middle of a cultural revolution? What does the distribution of wealth, opportunities, and privileges look like in Communist China?

To find out, we're going to learn a little about Chinese history. We'll read a comprehensive (epic!) biography on the legendary Chairman Mao, and we'll look at contemporary Chinese art – dissenting and non – and try to wrap our heads about our mystical and mammoth neighbor to the East! Come check out China this spring!

LBST B497: Seminar in the Liberal Studies Among the Disciplines (2)—McCoy

Senior standing Liberal Studies majors thesis course.

Spring Theatre Courses

THEA 170: Fundamentals of Acting—Ricardo

No Pre-reqs. Counts as humanities, fine arts, or liberal arts elective.

Fundamentals of Acting will serve as an introduction to acting methodology and practice.  Through exploration of the instrument, namely our bodies, and its communicative potential, we will examine the possibility of voice and movement in culmination with thought and feeling.  We will explore creation and implementation through games, exercises and critical analysis, and our endeavors will ultimately come to fruition through the final scene. The goal of this class is to cultivate the basic imaginative, physical and vocal skills necessary for acting. Through this work, the hope is to sharpen the student's observational skills toward life, so that he or she may channel this into artistic sensibility. Most importantly, this class will stress the importance of play.  The goal of this course is not necessarily to train students to become great actors, but to use the actor's tools to improve skills in communication, analysis, and critical thinking.

THEA 200: Understanding and Appreciation of Theater—Pate

No Pre-reqs. Counts as humanities, fine arts, or liberal arts elective.

In an increasingly digital and media-saturated world, does theater still matter? This course explores the history and practice of theater and its relationship to broader cultural and social issues to empower students to answer that question (and, of course, to better appreciate theater). We'll look at Western theater's roots as a practice of civic engagement, learn about how theater is made today and the various roles that contribute to its creation, and try to understand what theater's place can be in broader discourse. In studying theater practices as varying as community theater, Broadway musicals, and Southeast Asian dance dramas, students will cultivate the tools needed to assess the role that theater plays in shaping not only our perception of the world but also the world itself.

THEA 301 / ENGL 301: Theater History I—Pate

Counts as humanities, fine arts, or liberal arts elective, and for the Theater minor.

Gods. Demons. Kings. The stages and pages of Western Theater History from the ancient Greeks to 1800 were filled with ritual and debate, religion and politics, economics and culture. In this course, we'll examine the development of theatrical texts and practices and their place in shaping social and aesthetic discourse. Part dramatic literature, part cultural history, this class digs deep into texts through close reading while also sending up a periscope to look around at all the other theatrical practices happening around the written word. We'll read about the impact of historical context on theater and about theater's impact on history. We'll read plays ranging from the Greek classics to medieval mystery plays to the Renaissance throughout Europe and through the Enlightenment. And, perhaps most importantly, we'll explore the theories of theater practitioners throughout history, in their own words, of how and why to create theater. Open to students from any major.

THEA 370: Intermediate Acting—Ricardo

Counts as humanities, fine arts, or liberal arts elective, and for the Theater minor.

Intermediate Acting will expand upon the skills and techniques learned in Fundamentals of Acting.  The goal of this class is to move beyond the basic imaginative, physical, and vocal skills necessary for acting and toward a more complete mastery of characterization.  Working together, as an ensemble, students will endeavor to create new works throughout the course of the semester.  This class will be run more along the lines of a conservatory model.  Attendance and participation are imperative for the success of the ensemble.