America's Reconstruction

Faculty and Staff

Faculty

J. Brent Morris will serve as Project Director for the Summer Institute. Dr. Morris is Assistant Professor of History at the University of South Carolina Beaufort. He received his Ph.D. from Cornell University in 2010, and has been awarded recent grants or fellowships from the NEH, Association for Documentary Editing, the USC Institute for Southern Studies, the USC Institute for African American Research, Cornell University, Oberlin College, the Sea Islands Institute, and the New York Humanities Council. His book Oberlin, Hotbed of Abolitionism: College, Community, and the Fight for Freedom and Equality in Antebellum America was published by the University of North Carolina Press in 2014. He is also the author of Yes Lord I Know the Road: A Documentary History of African Americans in South Carolina, 1526-2008, forthcoming from the University of South Carolina Press, and coeditor of The Untold Story: Visual Essays on America’s Reconstruction (Lowcountry Scholars’ Press, 2015). Brent was the 2010 recipient of the South Carolina Historical Society's Malcolm C. Clark Award, and is the recipient of the 2015-2016 University of South Carolina Breakthrough Star for Research and Scholarship award.

Michael Allen is National Park Service Gullah/Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor Coordinator. Michael Allen began his public career as a Cooperative Education Student with the National Park Service in 1980. Mr. Allen has served as a Park Ranger and is now the Community Partnership Specialist for Fort Sumter National Monument and Charles Pinckney National Historic Site. He played a major role in the National Park Service's Gullah-Geechee Special Resource Study, which examined the feasibility and suitability of establishing educational centers along the southeast coast as well as determining ways to increase interpretation and preservation of the Gullah/Geechee culture and history.

In October 2007, Mr. Allen was instrumental in the establishment of the Gullah Geechee Heritage Commission. He provided inspiration and guidance to ensure that the nine year journey became a reality. He continues to provide hope, opportunity and support to grass root organizations in the wider Gullah Geechee Community. Finally Michael's motto is, "to understand the present and move toward the future, you must first know and accept your past."

Edward L. Ayers Edward Ayers is President Emeritus of the University of Richmond, where he now serves as Tucker-Boatwright Professor of the Humanities. Previously Dean of Arts and Sciences at the University of Virginia, where he began teaching in 1980, Ayers was named the National Professor of the Year by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching in 2003.

A historian of the American South, Ayers has written and edited 10 books. The Promise of the New South: Life After Reconstruction was a finalist for both the National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize. In the Presence of Mine Enemies: Civil War in the Heart of America won the Bancroft Prize for distinguished writing in American history and the Beveridge Prize for the best book in English on the history of the Americas since 1492. He was awarded the National Humanities Medal in 2013.

A pioneer in digital history, Ayers created "The Valley of the Shadow: Two Communities in the American Civil War," a website that has attracted millions of users and won major prizes in the teaching of history. He serves as co-editor of the Atlas of the Historical Geography of the United States at the University of Richmond's Digital Scholarship Lab and is a co-host of BackStory with the American History Guys, a nationally syndicated radio show and podcast.

Ayers has received a presidential appointment to the National Council on the Humanities, served as a Fulbright professor in the Netherlands, and been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Edward E. Baptist is Professor of History at Cornell University. His scholarship is centered on the 19th-century United States and, more broadly, the creation of the modern world. One specific research focus is the massive growth of slavery in the United States between the American Revolution and the Civil War, an expansion that shaped the emergence of both American and global capitalism. He teaches a wide variety of courses on U.S. political history, the history of slavery, and, the history of American capitalism.

David W Blight. David W. Blight is a teacher, scholar and public historian. At Yale University he is Class of 1954 Professor of American History and Director of the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition.

Blight works in many capacities in the world of public history, including on boards of museums and historical societies, and as a member of a small team of advisors to the 9/11 Memorial and Museum team of curators. For that institution he wrote the recently published essay, “Will It Rise: September 11 in American Memory.” In 2012, Blight was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and delivered an induction address, “The Pleasure and Pain of History.”

Blight’s newest books include annotated editions, with introductory essay, of Frederick Douglass’s second autobiography, My Bondage and My Freedom (Yale Univ. Press, 2013), Robert Penn Warren’s Who Speaks for the Negro, (Yale Univ. Press, 2014), and the monograph, American Oracle: The Civil War in the Civil Rights Era (Harvard University Press, published August 2011), which received the 2012 Anisfield-Wolf Award for best book in non-fiction on racism and human diversity. American Oracle is an intellectual history of Civil War memory, rooted in the work of Robert Penn Warren, Bruce Catton, Edmund Wilson, and James Baldwin. Blight is also the author of A Slave No More: Two Men Who Escaped to Freedom, Including their Narratives of Emancipation, (Harcourt, 2007), paperback in 2009. Blight is also the author of Race and Reunion: The Civil War in American Memory (Harvard University Press, 2001), which received eight book awards, including the Bancroft Prize, the Abraham Lincoln Prize, and the Frederick Douglass Prize as well as four awards from the Organization of American Historians, including the Merle Curti prizes for both intellectual and social history.  

Blight is also a frequent book reviewer for the New York Times, Washington Post Book World, the Chicago Tribune, the Los Angeles Times, the San Francisco Chronicle, the Boston Globe, Slate.com and other newspapers, and has written many articles on abolitionism, American historical memory, and African American intellectual and cultural history.  He is one of the authors of the bestselling American history textbook for the college level, A People and a Nation (Cengage). He is also series advisor and editor for the Bedford Books series in American History and Culture, a popular series of teaching books for the college level. Blight lectures widely in the US and around the world on the Civil War and Reconstruction, race relations, Douglass, Du Bois, and problems in public history and American historical memory. He teaches summer institutes for secondary teachers and for park rangers and historians in the National Park Service, devoting a good deal of time to these and many other public history initiatives.

Joshua Brown is executive director of the American Social History Project/Center for Media and Learning and professor of history at the City University of New York Graduate Center. He is author of Beyond the Lines: The Pictorial Press, Everyday Life, and the Crisis of Gilded Age America (2002), visual essayist of Forever Free: The Story of Emancipation and Reconstruction (2005), visual editor of Who Built America?Working People and the Nation's History (1989, 1992, 2000, 2008), and co-editor of History from South Africa: Alternative Visions and Practices (1991). A recipient of fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, American Council of Learned Societies, and the Guggenheim Foundation, he is currently writing a book-length study of the visual culture of the Civil War. He has co-produced numerous award-winning documentary and digital projects, including Who Built America?; History Matters; The Lost Museum; Liberty, Equality, Fraternity; and The September 11 Digital Archive. His art appears regularly in print and online—most recently Ithaca, a graphic novel about Reconstruction serialized on the Common-place website (2010-13). 

Orville Vernon Burton is Creativity Professor of Humanities, Professor of History, Sociology, and Computer Science at Clemson University, and the Director of the Clemson CyberInstitute. From 2008-2010, he was the Burroughs Distinguished Professor of Southern History and Culture at Coastal Carolina University. He was the founding Director of the Institute for Computing in Humanities, Arts, and Social Science (I CHASS) at the University of Illinois, where he is emeritus University Distinguished Teacher/Scholar, University Scholar, and Professor of History, African American Studies, and Sociology. At the University of Illinois, he continues to chair the I-CHASS advisory board and is also a Senior Research Scientist at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) where he served as Associate Director for Humanities and Social Sciences from 2002-2010. Burton serves as vice-chair of the Board of Directors of the Congressional National Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Foundation. In 2007 the Illinois State legislature honored him with a special resolution for his contributions as a scholar, teacher, and citizen of Illinois. A recognized expert on race relations and the American South, and a leader in Digital Humanities, Burton is often invited to present lectures, conduct workshops, and consult with colleges, universities, and granting agencies.

Burton is a prolific author and scholar (twenty authored or edited books and more than two hundred articles); and author or director of numerous digital humanities projects. The Age of Lincoln (2007) won the Chicago Tribune Heartland Literary Award for Nonfiction and was selected for Book of the Month Club, History Book Club, and Military Book Club. One reviewer proclaimed, “If the Civil War era was America's ‘Iliad,’ then historian Orville Vernon Burton is our latest Homer.” The book was featured at sessions of the annual meetings of African American History and Life Association, the Social Science History Association, the Southern Intellectual History Circle, and the latter was the basis for a forum published in The Journal of the Historical Society. His In My Father’s House Are Many Mansions: Family and Community in Edgefield, South Carolina (1985) was featured at sessions of the Southern Historical Association and the Social Science History Association annual meetings. The Age of Lincoln and In My Fathers’ House were nominated for Pulitzers. His most recent book, is Penn Center: A History Preserved (2014)

Recognized for his teaching, Burton was selected nationwide as the 1999 U.S. Research and Doctoral University Professor of the Year (presented by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and by the Council for Advancement and Support of Education). In 2004 he received the American Historical Association’s Eugene Asher Distinguished Teaching Prize. At the University of Illinois he won teaching awards at the department, school, college, and campus levels. He was the recipient of the 2001-2002 Graduate College Outstanding Mentor Award and received the 2006 Campus Award for Excellence in Public Engagement from the University of Illinois. He was appointed an Organization of American Historians Distinguished Lecturer for 2004-16.

Burton's research and teaching interests include the American South, especially race relations and community, and the intersection of humanities and social sciences. He has served as president of the Southern Historical Association and of the Agricultural History Society. He was elected to honorary life membership in BrANCH (British American Nineteenth-Century Historians). Among his honors are fellowships and grants from the Rockefeller Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Pew Foundation, the National Science Foundation, the American Council of Learned Societies, the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, the National Humanities Center, the U.S. Department of Education, National Park Service, and the Carnegie Foundation. He was a Pew National Fellow Carnegie Scholar for 2000-2001. He was elected to the Society of American Historians and was one of ten historians selected to contribute to the Presidential Inaugural Portfolio (January 21, 2013) by the Joint Congressional Committee on Inaugural Ceremonies.

Emory Campbell is a renowned community leader among the Gullah people of the Lowcountry. Campbell was born and raised on Hilton Head Island, South Carolina before that island — now an internationally famous resort area — was connected to the mainland by a bridge. Campbell would later earn a master's degree in environmental engineering from Tufts University in Boston.

Campbell began his career in the 1970s as a community development activist, working to implement public health measures in impoverished rural areas and to preserve traditional Gullah communities threatened by out-of-control resort development on the Sea Islands. Later, as the Executive Director of Penn Center, Inc. on St. Helena Island, South Carolina Campbell helped lead the movement to preserve Gullah culture and make Gullah people in the rural areas more aware of the importance of their uniquely rich African cultural heritage. Campbell was a member of the committee that translated the New Testament into the Gullah language.

Beginning in the 1980s, Campbell helped spearhead the efforts to reestablish the family connection between the Gullah people and the West African nation of Sierra Leone. Campbell hosted Sierra Leone's President Joseph Saidu Momoh for the "Gullah Reunion" at Penn Center in 1988, and led the historic "Gullah Homecoming" to Sierra Leone in 1989. The Sierra Leoneans made Campbell an honorary paramount chief with the royal title of Kpaa Kori I. These events are chronicled in the SCETV documentary video "Family Across the Sea" (1990).

In 2005, Campbell received the Carter G. Woodson Memorial Award from the National Education Association for his lifelong work preserving Gullah heritage, the environment, and improving the Gullah community's living conditions. In 2008 Mr. Campbell was elected Chairman of the Gullah-Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor Commission, an organization empowered by the U.S. Congress to develop a program to commemorate Gullah culture in the low country region from Wilmington, North Carolina to Jacksonville, Florida. Campbell is author of Gullah Cultural Legacies (2008), and the director of Gullah Heritage Consulting Services based on Hilton Head Island, South Carolina.

Grace Cordial has been responsible for the day-to-day operation of the Beaufort District Collection at the Beaufort County Library since 1999. The Beaufort District Collection exists to acquire, preserve, maintain and make accessible a research collection of permanent value which records the history, culture, and environment of our part of the South Carolina lowcountry. Besides the research room, Cordial manages the “Virtual BDC:” theBDC web pages, the Online Obituary Index, two digital collections, a new BDC.BCL Facebook page, and the Connections blog.
 
Among her duties is to coordinate or present programs about local history, Gullah culture, and our coastal environment, including occasional instructional sessions about how to perform historical and/or genealogical research. 

Russell Duncan. Lead scholar on critical time periods for Reconstruction on Black settlements on the coast of GA and on the politics of Tunis Campbell. Duncan is Professor of American History and Social Sciences at The English Institute University of Copenhagen, Denmark. For 30 Years Duncan has been involved in research, writing, lecturing and teaching on Antebellum, Civil War, and Reconstruction era American History. His present research focused on the 2nd South Carolina (Colored) Infantry and its formation and activities during the Civil War.

Minuette Floyd is an art educator at USC who will serve as curator of exhibits and assist and guide participants with a project during the visit to Sapelo Island Georgia. Floyd is an associate professor of art education and Director of the Young Artist’s Workshop at the University of South Carolina School of Visual Art and Design. She teaches both graduate and undergraduate courses which assist in the preparation of art education majors to become teachers in Pre-Kindergarten through Twelfth grade. Her research interests focus on multicultural art education, interdisciplinary art instruction, and documentation of folk traditions.

She is a graduate of the Riley Diversity Leadership Institute (Midlands Class V, 2012) sponsored by Furman University in Greenville, South Carolina.  Awards include the Dr. Deborah Smith Hoffman Mentor Award (2012), the J. Eugene Grigsby Award (2010), the Mac Arthur Goodwin Award (2009), Living the Legacy Award given by the National Council of Negro Women, (2009), National Outstanding Performance in Higher Education Award (2003), the Mary J. Rouse Award for Art Education (2002), and the South Carolina Art Education Association Award for Art Education (2001). She is the past chair of the Committee on Multiethnic Concerns, an affiliate of the National Art Education Association.  She serves on the steering committee of the Arts in the Basic Curriculum Project, the board of the South Carolina Alliance for Art Education, and the Education Advisory Committee at the Columbia Museum of Art.

She received two Fulbright Hays Awards to travel and study in both Senegal (2009) and South Africa (2002). Additionally, grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, the South Carolina Humanities Council, and the South Carolina Arts Commission enabled her to compile a photographic documentary based on African-American Camp Meeting Traditions.

This interactive exhibition, consists of 42 large black and white photographs, is scheduled to be shown at the Avery Center in Charleston, SC, the Ritz Museum and Theatre in Jacksonville, Florida, and the Martha’s Vineyard History Museum in 2015-2016. The exhibit was displayed at the Charlotte Museum of History in North Carolina and the Moore Methodist Center at St.Simon’s Island, Georgia in 2010, and the McKissick Museum at the University of South Carolina in 2008.

Her book entitled A Place to Worship: Carolina Camp Meetings, An African-American Tradition will be published through the University of South Carolina Press.  

Laura Hart is a technical services archivist with Wilson Special Collections Library at UNC Chapel Hill. She holds master’s degrees in history and information science and has worked with historical documents for more than twenty years. In addition to her responsibilities arranging and describing manuscripts and photographs for preservation and access, she has aided many scholars of the American South with their research projects. For nine years, she taught a seminar course titled “Interpreting the South from Manuscripts” for first year students at UNC Chapel Hill and made extensive use of the Penn School Papers to help students build critical thinking and analytical skills and gain a better understanding of our region and nation’s past.

Faye Jensen Born in Virginia, Faye Jensen received her B.A. from the University of Georgia and her Ph.D. from Emory University. She was trained as an archivist by the National Archives and Records Administration at the Jimmy Carter Presidential Library. While at the Carter Library, Dr. Jensen focused on the papers of the First Lady and published “‘These are Precious Years,’ The Papers of Rosalynn Carter,” in Modern First Ladies: Their Documentary Legacy. Dr. Jensen taught history for nearly twenty years at several colleges and universities, including Perimeter College in Atlanta, the University of Alabama in Huntsville, and The Citadel. With an interest in the post-Civil War South, Dr. Jensen recently contributed a chapter to Making a New South, published by the University of Florida Press. 

Daisy Martin. Lead Scholar on finding and teaching with primary source documents. Professor Martin is Director of History Performance Assessment at the Stanford Center for Assessment, Learning, and Equity [SCALE] and teaches in the Stanford University and UC Santa Cruz’s Teacher Educator Programs. Martin is a former high school history and civics teacher who served as co-director of the Stanford History Education Group. She earned her PhD in Curriculum and Teacher Education in History and Social Science Education in 2005 with a dissertation entitled "Teaching for Historical Thinking: Teacher Conceptions, Practices, and Constraints." She recently co-directed Historical Thinking Matters, serves as teaching consultant with professional development efforts organized by the Martin Luther King Jr. Papers Project, and teaches history teacher-candidates. She has worked with elementary, middle, and high school teachers in TAH grants in California, Nebraska, Ohio, and Tennessee, and led professional development workshops funded by NEH, the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, and the Teachers for a New Era project at Stanford. Current projects include creating classroom ready resources for teaching historical problems and researching teacher practices and conceptions relevant to this kind of teaching. Her publications include articles in The History Teacher and Educational Leadership.

 Page Miller is a public historian who will serve as the institute’s site historian and lead our tour sessions. After earning her MA and PhD from the University of Maryland, Page served as Instructor of history at University College, University of Maryland, Executive Director of the National Coordinating Committee for the Promotion of History, and Distinguished Visiting Lecturer in the History Department at the University of South Carolina. She is the author of several books, including A Claim to New Roles (1985), Landmarks of American Women’s History (2003), Fripp Island: A History (2006), and Celebrating One Hundred Years: History of First Presbyterian Church, Beaufort, SC (2012). She has been awarded the Third National Conference on Women and Historic Preservation Award, the American Historical Association’s Troyer Steele Anderson Prize, the Society for History in the Federal Government’s “Franklin Delano Roosevelt Award,” the National Council on Public History’s “Robert Kelley Memorial Award,” a Mellon Research Fellowship for Study of Modern Archives, the "Sesquicentennial Medallion Award," Mary Baldwin College, the “Directors Award for Distinguished Service" from the Federation of Genealogical Societies, and citations for "Outstanding and Dedicated Service to the Society and to the Advancement of Historical Study of the Federal Government" from the Society for History in the Federal Government, for "Extraordinary Service to the Historical Profession" from the California Committee for the Promotion of History, and "Exemplary Service Citation" from the Society of American Archivists. 

Bernard Powers has served as Department Chair, Associate Chair and as Director of the M.A. History Program at the College of Charleston. He has published numerous works on African American social and cultural evolution. His major work is Black Charlestonians: A Social History 1822-1885, (University of Arkansas Press,1994). which won a Choice Award for Best Academic Books. 

He was associate editor for the The South Carolina Encyclopedia (Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina, 2006).

He serves as chief historian on the strategic plan for the International African American Museum (Charleston) and as evaluator for the African American Focus Tours at Drayton Hall Plantation for the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

His article "Community Evolution and Race Relations in Reconstruction Charleston, S.C." was selected as one of the "Three Articles From A Century of Excellence" Centennial Volume 1900-2000 of The South Carolina Historical Magazine.

Heather Cox Richardson is professor of history at Boston College. Previously professor of history at the University of Massachusetts, she received her Ph.D. in 1992 from Harvard’s Program in the History of American Civilization.

 Heather Richardson is committed to bridging the gap between professional historians and the public. She has appeared on a Bill Moyers documentary, “The Chinese in America” and works with two educational consulting firms to train secondary school teachers and conduct public historical seminars. She reviews books for popular media like the Chicago Tribune as well as a wide range of scholarly journals.

 Her most recent book, Wounded Knee: Party Politics and the Road to an American Massacre was published by Basic Books. She also is the author of West from Appomattox: The Reconstruction of America after the Civil War, which was published by Yale University Press and explores the ways in which a popular conflict over race and labor combined in the postwar years with Westward expansion and a novel kind of women’s activism. Her earlier books include The Greatest Nation of the Earth: Republican Economic Policies During the Civil War and The Death of Reconstruction: Race, Labor, and Politics in the Post-Civil War North, 1865-1901, both published by Harvard University Press.

Lawrence Rowland is Distinguished Professor Emeritus of History for the University of South Carolina Beaufort and previously held roles with the University as Professor of History and Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, and is a past president of the South Carolina Historical Society. He holds a bachelors of arts from Hamilton College (New York), and both a masters and doctorate from the University of South Carolina. Professor Rowland is author of numerous articles and book reviews on South Carolina and Sea Island history. He is the author of The History of Beaufort County, South Carolina, Vol. I, 1514-1861, with Alexander Moore and George C. Rogers, Jr., 1996. (1996), Window on the Atlantic: The Rise and Fall of Santa Elena, South Carolina Spanish City (1990), The Civil War in South Carolina: Selections from the South Carolina Historical Magazine, Co-editor with Stephen G. Hoffius, (2011), and The History of Beaufort County, South Carolina, Vol. II and Vol. III, 1861-1990, with Stephen R. Wise and Gerhard Spieler (2015).

Nathan Saunders is Curator of Manuscripts at the South Caroliniana Library at the University of South Carolina.

Lynette Stoudt Ms. Stoudt is responsible for the management and operations of the Georgia Historical Society Research Center. She works closely with development and administrative staff to enhance access to GHS collections and diversify holdings. Ms. Stoudt holds a master’s in library and information science, with an emphasis on archival studies, from San Jose State University in California. Prior to joining GHS she was an archivist at the Bancroft Library at the University of California, Berkeley, an archivist and records management consultant with History Associates Incorporated, and worked in the Special Collections libraries of the University of California in Irvine and San Diego.

Patricia Sullivan is Professor of History at the University of South Carolina. She specializes in modern United States history, with an emphasis on African American history, race relations, and the history of the Civil Rights Movement. Professor Sullivan teaches courses in twentieth century U.S. history. Areas of interest include African American history; the South since the Civil War; race, reform and politics in the United States; and the history of the Civil Rights Movement. She teaches graduate courses on modern American history, African American history and on civil rights struggles in the twentieth century. Her most recent book, Lift Every Voice: The NAACP and the Making of the Civil Rights Movement, is the first history of the formative decades of the nation's oldest civil rights organization. Henry Louis Gates Jr. described the book as "a major contribution to our understanding of the political and cultural history of African Americans-indeed of America itself." Other books include: Days of Hope: Race and Democracy in the New Deal Era; Freedom Writer: Virginia Foster Durr, Letters from the Civil Rights Years; New Directions in Civil Rights Studies, co-edited with Armstead L. Robinson, and Civil Rights in the United States, a 2-volume encyclopedia, coedited with Waldo E. Martin Jr. She and Waldo Martin are editors of the John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture, published by the University of North Carolina Press. Since 1997, Professor Sullivan has codirected an NEH Summer Institute at Harvard's W.E.B. Du Bois Institute with Waldo Martin on "Teaching the History of the Civil Rights Movement."

Velma Maia Thomas is the author of several nonfiction books on African American history, including the award-winning interactive Lest We Forget: The Passage from Africa to Slavery and Emancipation(Random House, 1997). Additional books in the series are Freedom's Children, No Man Can Hinder Me, and We Shall Not Be Moved. Maia served as manager of the Shrine of the Black Madonna Bookstore and Cultural Center in Atlanta, Georgia, from 1987 to 2000, where she created the nationally acclaimed Black Holocaust Exhibit, a collection of original documents on slavery in America.

A gifted writer and public historian, Maia was one of 100 distinguished Americans selected to contribute to Lift Every Voice and Sing: A Celebration of the Negro National Anthem(Random House, 2000). She also was selected to write the introduction to Finding A Place Called Home: A Guide to African-American Genealogy and Historical Identity(Random House, 1999). Her latest work, The Odd Fellow City: The Promise of a Leading Black Town, has been published in the 2012 edition of the Journal of the Georgia Association of Historians. Early in 2012, she served as a subject expert for the PBS documentary, Underground Railroad: The William Still Story, which aired nationally in February.

Maia holds a bachelor's degree in journalism from Howard University, a master's degree in political science from Emory University, and graduate level certificate in Heritage Preservation from Georgia State University. She has served as keynote speaker at universities, libraries, and museums across the nation and has served as a distinguished scholar at the historic Penn Center on St. Helena, Island, South Carolina. Maia has been interviewed by the New York Times,The Atlanta Journal and Constitution, and the British Broadcasting Corporation. She continues to write, teach, and speak on African American history, using her engaging style to bring history to life.

Stephen Wise Dr. Wise is the director of the Parris Island Museum and the Cultural Resources Manager for the Marine Corps Recruit Depot, Parris Island. A native of Toledo, Ohio, Dr. Wise received his bachelor degree from Wittenberg University and a master's degree from Bowling Green State University. He received his doctorate at the University of South Carolina. He has written a number of works including Lifeline of the Confederacy: Blockade Running During the Civil War and Gate of Hell: The Campaign for Charleston Harbor 1863. Since 1984 he has taught for the University of South Carolina Beaufort's military program as an adjunct professor. He has appeared on the Arts and Entertainment Channel, the History Channel and the Discovery Channel as well as appearing in various British Broadcasting Company and South Carolina Education Television and Radio productions. He wrote the screen narrative for the Gilded Age Productions film American Iliad: The Siege of Charleston, a docufilm on the Civil War in the Charleston area. Dr. Wise served on the faculty for Penn Center's Gullah Institute and is an advisor to the South Carolina Battleground Preservation Trust. He is currently serving on the editorial board for the South Carolina Historical Magazine. His most recent work written in conjunction with Dr. Lawrence Rowland is Rebellion, Reconstruction and Redemption: The History of Beaufort Count 1861-1893 which will be published in the summer of 2015 by the University of South Carolina Press.

 

Staff

Valencia Abbott. Institute Assistant/ Photographer. Valencia is a Social Studies/History  teacher at the Rockingham Early College in Wentworth, NC. She received her BA from Catawba College and MA from UNG Greensboro. She is also a budding photographer. She was a teacher scholar in the USCB NEH 2015 Summer institute. She will return in 2017 to assist the institute by capturing and documenting the institute with her photography and helping with the logistics of the institute. She will accompany participants, scholars and staff on institute excursions and work with instructors and staff to enhance the living and learning experience of participants. She will assist in the monitoring and evaluation of the institute through formal and informal methods to identify areas in need of improvement and assist in the daily coordination, planning, and logistics for special events and programs.

Ericka Morris. Institute Assistant. Ericka is a teacher and alumna of our 2015 Summer Institute. She graduated from the University of Kansas in 2003 with a Bachelors of Arts degree in American, African and African American Studies. On returning to Philadelphia after graduation, Ericka has worked as an educator for the last 10 years while finishing a Master in Multi-Cultural Education at Eastern University in St. Davids, PA. The 2015 institute inspired Ericka to apply to the PhD Public History program at North Carolina State University. In her role as Institute Assistant she will assist in organizing all logistics for the institute including providing classroom set-up and support to faculty, accompany participants, scholars and staff on excursions, assist with campus logistics, work with instructors and staff to enhance the living and learning experience of participants and assist in the monitoring and evaluation of the institute through formal and informal methods to identify areas in need of improvement, assist in the daily coordination, planning, and logistics for special events and programs.

Deloris Pringle will serve as project Coordinator. Ms. Pringle is particularly well suited to coordinate this grant. She has served as coordinator for two other highly successful NEH Summer institutes. Pringle will be responsible for coordination of institute sessions, preparation of materials, and collaboration with local cultural institutions.

Thomas Thurston will serve asProject Advisor/Teacher Liaison. He is the Director of Education at the Yale Gilder Lehrman Center, holds a B.A. in American Studies from the University of California at Santa Cruz and an MPhl in American Studies from Yale University. Prior to coming to the Gilder Lehrman Center he served as the Project Director of the New Deal Network, an educational website developed by the Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt Institute and the Institute for Learning Technologies at Teachers College, Columbia University. For his work developing the New Deal Network he received the first annual award for “Best Multimedia Resource” from the American Association for History and Computing and a “Best of the Humanities on the Web” citation from the National Endowment for the Humanities.Tom has led week-long NEH workshops for K-12 teachers, has acted as a consulting historian for several Teaching American History programs, and has served as a curriculum developer for WNET’s Educational Technologies Department, including the documentary series “The Rise and Fall of Jim Crow” and “Slavery and the Making of America.” In his role for the summer institute he will guide the teachers though their visual essay projects and lesson plans, and provide content support and links to resources.

Lemuel Watson. Dr. Watson will serve as Institute Curator ofProfessional Development. He is Dean of the College of Education at the University of South Carolina and Professor in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policies. Dr. Watson is the former the Executive Director of the Center for P–20 Engagement and Dean of the College of Education at Northern Illinois University; he is also the former Dean for the division of Academic Support at Heartland College. He is an alumni of the Darla Moore School of Business at USC. He completed his master’s degree at Ball State University in Muncie, Indiana and a doctorate degree in higher education and policy from Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana. His career spans across various divisions in educational organizations where he has been a teacher, faculty, policy analyst, and administrator.